*|MC:SUBJECT|*
VALUE CHAIN NEWS FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT - EVERY TUESDAY
This newsletter contains links to content located on external websites.
Over time it is likely that some of the links to this content may be broken.
You are advised to download material of interest as soon as possible.
LOGO OF THE
NEWS & RESEARCH FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT
(#5 / 2019 - 5 March 2019)
www.africantextilesandapparel.com
NEWS

SOUTH AFRICA – ECDON SAVED … AGAIN … WELL FOR THE TIME BEING, 1 March 2019
South Africa's Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF), debt holders and landlords have all come to the rescue of the troubled EDCON (SEE >>) group — which owns Edgars, Jet and CNA — in a deal that proponents say will avert a "jobs massacre" and swathes of mall space being shuttered. The recapitalisation programme will inject R2.7bn (US$189.7m) into the company through new cash commitments from the parties and rent reductions by participating landlords, the company said in a statement. READ HERE >>

Comment
EDCON must have the Lone Ranger on speed dial! How many times has EDCON been rescued?

In late February 2019, the Congress of South African Trade Unions' (COSATU) Central Executive Committee (CEC) commented on the issue. They welcomed the news that the UIF will step in to assist EDCON to avoid liquidation. They said that the move would result in 140,000 jobs being saved [NOTE - this figure is bandied about a lot ... I wonder how accurate it is?]. The CEC acknowledged the critical leadership of the workers' federation, COSATU, for resolving the potential liquidation of EDCON. The CEC insisted though that COSATU needs to make sure that the usage of the UIF funds remains "worker friendly". READ HERE >>

According to COSATU, the UIF injected R1.2bn (US$83.3m) into EDCON.

Undoubtedly, its unlikely that the UIF funding would have come through if it were not for the efforts of the COSATU's affiliated Southern African Clothing & Textile Workers' Union (SACTWU). It had to intervene because it had many members in the country's garment manufacturers that were supplying EDCON with goods; it's also possible that SACTWU had some members in EDCON stores itself (NOTE: SACTWU has for some time spread its wings and recruited workers in many of South Africa's leading apparel retailers).

But what concessions did SACTWU get for assisting in the process? Some of the labour proposals on the table surely were that EDCON management:
  • commits to buying more South African made garments
  • will put in place mechanisms to ensure that where it sells imported products that the full import duties on these products are paid
  • undertakes to limit store retrenchments over the next couple of years
  • EDCON management instructs its buyers and the design/sourcing houses that buy goods for it to no longer buy from manufacturing establishments that do not pay the country's legal minimum wage / or which do not abide by centralised clothing Bargaining Council wages agreements / or which procure garments from bogus co-operatives. EDCON is rumoured to be a HUGE ultimate buyer of goods made in the town of Newcastle (in the country's KwaZulu-Natal province). It has long been the case that many garment manufacturers in that area have flouted the country's labour laws or have used disingenuous legal mechanisms (e.g. making workers independent contractors; or, members of co-operatives) to avoid paying minimum wages. Newcastle is also getting a reputation where foreign workers (mainly from Lesotho and eSwatini) are trafficked to work in garment factories.
I strongly suspect that the UIF contribution (NOTE: is this a loan or is it an equity stake?) to the save EDCON rescue pot was a matter that was discussed and approved by the South African Cabinet – a cabinet meeting took place two days before (on 27 February 2019) the UIF contribution announcement (1 March 2019) was made. It was a considerable amount of cash - and would most probably have needed cabinet approval – I guess that an individual Cabinet Minister may have been too scared to make the call themselves.

If there is a "no-retrenchment" clause, this apparently will not apply to EDCON stores outside of South Africa. It has been announced that EDCON will be closing two underperforming Jet stores in early March. Jet Stores Namibia has 34 branches countrywide, employing 402 people. READ HERE >>

What remains unclear is the status of the part EDCON owned Celrose manufacturing facility (a garment firm (SEE >>)) and Eddels (a footwear firm (SEE >>)). It has been rumoured that South Africa's Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) was being requested to consider (sme may say "pressured") into consider buying EDCON's stake in the venture.

More on the elements of the save-EDCON-package can be found in previous editions of the "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" – see Vol.2 No.2 (12 February 2019); and Vol.2. No.3 (19 February 2019).


ETHIOPIA – INDIAN INVESTMENT IN ETHIOPIA'S TEXTILE & APPAREL SECTOR, 1 March 2019
Standalone Indian investments in Ethiopia's textile and garment sector totalled 31 manufacturing-related projects at the end of 2018, according to foreign investment data from the Ethiopian Investment Commission. The number is second only to China, which topped the list with 151 such investments. READ HERE >>


KENYA – MINIMUM WAGES STILL A CONCERN FOR EMPLOYERS, 1 February 2019
Kenya's textile and apparels sector, under the umbrella of the Kenya Manufacturers Association (KAM), met with the Ministry of Labour & Social Protection Cabinet Secretary (CS), the Chief Administrative Secretary, and the Principal Secretary on 1 February 2019 to discuss the 5% wage increment that was gazetted in mid-January 2019. The CS urged manufacturers to absorb the 5% wage increment as the Ministry would have difficulty in providing an exemption (as per agreement of the 14 May 2018 meeting in olving the parties), due to the resultant labour crises that would happen if exemptions are granted.

Key outcomes of the meeting include: i) the Ministry will gazette a Council to take care of remuneration, staff welfare and other policies within the EPZ based textiles and apparels manufacturing. This will safeguard against future "ceremonial wage increments" and maintain high staff engagement and welfare emphasis: ii) further discussion on the effective date of the 5% minimum wage increase (to be 8 January 2019 and not backdated to May 2018); and, iii) the Ministry will have joint engagements with the Ministry of Industry, Trade & Cooperatives so as to deliberate on creating a good policy environment for the sector. READ HERE >>

For more on the 2018/19 Kenyan minimum wage increase – that was gazetted 8.5 months after the wage increase should have been implemented - see the "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" Vol. 2. No.2. of 12 February 2019. Kenya's monthly minimum wage for a garment worker in Nairobi/Mombasa is now Ksh15,383.45 (US$153.57).


ETHIOPIA – NEW INDUSTRIAL PARK INAUGURATED, 2 March 2019
Ethiopia's Prime Minister has inaugurated Debre Birhan Industrial Park (DIP). The Ethiopian government has invested US$71m for the construction of the DIP which is located in Amhara Region around 170 kilometres from the capital Addis Ababa. DIP has eight sheds built on 44,000 square meters of land. The park has a total of 75 hectares, which will soon expand to 1,000 hectares focusing on textiles and agro-processing. It is planned to create 13,000 jobs initially. READ HERE >>


MOZAMBIQUE – TEXTILE MILL TO BE RESUSCITATED BY SOUTH AFRICANS, 28 February 2019
The governor of Mozambique's Manica province has stated that South African companies linked to the textile sector have expressed an interest in reactivating the factory of the former Textáfrica – in the town of Chimoio. READ HERE >>

A Brief History of Textáfrica
It was established in the 1960s, and at its height, it employed over 3,300 workers.

In 1996, the Portuguese Multiplier Group took a majority holding in Textáfrica, with 60% of the shares. The Mozambican state held 30%, and the remaining amount was owned by the country's largest bank, the BCM (privatised in 1996, and now known as the Millennium-BIM). There was then new investment in the plant – and in 1997 Textáfrica won a prize as the country's largest exporter.

But it soon became clear that Textáfrica could not compete in the international market, and the domestic market could not absorb all its production (particularly given the unhindered invasion of the Mozambican marketplace by cheap Asian textiles, and the dumping of vast amounts of second-hand clothing from Europe and America).

With the factory running at an average monthly loss of US$150k Textáfrica asked the government to protect the textile industry, to no apparent effect. The factory ground to a halt in November 2000. But there was no formal declaration of bankruptcy, and so the workers remained legally employees of Textáfrica, and wage arrears built up. Only in February 2002 did a representative of the majority shareholder, told the workers to stay at home and "wait for new instructions". Then, the company no longer had the money to buy raw materials. Apparently, in 2004 all of its machinery was sold.

It has been reported that to revive the plant that the building will need a complete repair; and new electrical and cooling systems will have to be installed. Furthermore, new machinery must be acquired. Plus, whoever takes the plant over will have to pay off a loan for worker's wage arrears and redundancy payments. READ HERE >>

Comment
I often take statements that a textile or garment plant is going to be re-opened with a pinch of salt – for often politicians (and investment promotion agencies) like to puff-up optimism. Africa is littered with such kinds of plants - Mulungushi Textiles in Zambia; David Whiteheads and Merlin in Zimbabwe; Musoma Textiles and Mbeya Textiles in Tanzania; Spintex in Swaziland, etc, etc. Of course some revivals have worked - so I must report on them.

Nonetheless, I am sure that many textile manufacturers in South Africa will be looking at this Mozambique development with a little discomfort. This plant will naturally sell most of its product into South Africa. Certainly, South Africa's Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) will take a hard look at the development for they have a substantial amount of resources invested in the South African sector where it's likely that this resuscitated plant may operate – cotton spinning and weaving/knitting. The recently rescued Nova Texmoque (now called Mozambique Cotton Manufacturers (NKM)) is already chipping away at the sales of South African yarn producers (including Prilla 2000 (SEE >>) which is owned by the IDC) … and the owners of this plant are rumoured to be also contemplating installing knitting machinery.


SOUTH AFRICA – WOOLWORTHS' PROBLEMS ARE NOT ONLY DOWN UNDER, 28 February 2019
Its well known that Woolworths is having a difficult time. Here are some snippets from a long feature article on them that appeared in South Africa's "Financial Mail".

"Meanwhile, with so much energy focused on Australia, the fraying SA clothing business hasn't received the attention it needs. The group is now bleeding on two important fronts — and the churn in executives is not calming investor nerves."

"Our clothing business is coming back … we're doing the right thing, taking the right approach; the new executives understand the market," said the Woolworths' CEO.

"Christo Claassen, who was recruited from Edcon, proved not to be as dramatically successful as Carol Grolman, who joined Susman from Edgars in the 1990s and played a major role in Woolworths' clothing strategy at the time. Claassen left after a few short and unconvincing years."

"His replacement, Truworths' Manie Maritz, who will be joining only in 2020, has an excellent track record in men's clothing but not so much in women's fashion, where Woolworths' challenges lie."
READ HERE >> ("Financial Mail" of 28 February 2019 - subscription only)


EAST AFRICA – DEACONS IN ADMINISTRATION, December 2018 - March 2019
East African fashion retailer Deacons was placed under administration in December 2018. Deacons cited the withdrawal of strategic franchises, increased competition, the activities of the informal sector, and the collapse of anchor tenants at major shopping malls (Nakumatt and Uchumi) as critical factors that have plummeted the fortunes of the company. It has been reported that for the 2017 financial year the company reported a loss of Ksh841m (US$8.4m). This was compounded by a reduction of 62% in sales turnover and a further loss of Ksh328m (US$3.3m) incurred during the half year ended June 2018. Apparently, the joint administrators of the company are now looking for Ksh450m (US$4.5m) to settle the company's outstanding creditors and secured lenders, and to utilise the balance towards the working capital requirements of the company. READ HERE >> and HERE >> and HERE >>

Comment
Deacons have strong South African retailer connections. In May 2018 the company sold back to South Africa's Mr Price fashion retailer the 12 franchised operations it was operating in Kenya for R16m (US$1.12m). Apparently, Deacons still has a minority stake in the South African origin Woolworths stores that operate in East Africa; while it operates, on a franchise basis, some Truworths stores.


MALAWI – COTTON PRODUCTION UP, 26 February 2019
In a press briefing given by the Malawi Minister for Agriculture, Irrigation & Water Development it was disclosed that it had been estimated that cotton production was expected to increase by 35.3% due to seed availability, favourable weather and good market arrangements. It was notified that the Cotton Council had injected 600 tonnes of seed in the current season. READ HERE >>


MAURITIUS – CHANGES TO LABOUR LAWS, 25 February 2019
The Deputy Mauritian Prime Minister has noted that the government was working on several amendments to the country's labour-related laws. He said such changes are set to better protect workers in cases of the sudden closure of textile factories. READ HERE >>

Comment
The proposed labour law amendments must in some way be related to some of the problems that Mauritian garment firms are encountering – most recently it has been announced that Palmar Limitée (which employed about 1,000 Mauritians) – would be closing.

But the potential change in labour laws could be early politicking – Mauritius' next general election has to be held in the first half of 2020. On the other hand, could it be that the Mauritian government now wants to graduate from being an economy partly dependent upon textile and apparel manufacture to one being a more modern service economy? In this context Mauritius recently allowed minimum wages to rise – perhaps to discourage textile and garment production; and one does hear rumours that the government is not too comfortable allowing many thousands of Bangladeshi expatriate workers into the country who work in textile and garment plants
---------------------------------------
250 Mauritian, Bangladeshi and Malagasy workers employed by the Future Textiles factory have gone on strike after they were not paid their December 2018 salaries, and only part of their January 2019 wages. READ HERE >>


MADAGASCAR – ILO WORKPLACE HEALTH & SAFETY WORKSHOP, 25 February 2019
Thirty officials from the various ministries (Labour, Health, Agriculture, Trade & Industry) and organisations involved in the promotion of Safety and Health at Work (SST) in Madagascar and the social partners met in Antananarivo in February to reflect together on the concrete actions so that the system of SST is effective in the textile supply chain in Madagascar. READ HERE >>


ETHIOPIA – FOREX TRANSACTIONS, 23 February 2019
Companies operating in Ethiopia's industrial parks can transact in foreign currency while selling and buying raw materials with each other beginning February 2019, according to a new directive issued by the National Bank of Ethiopia (NBE). The new directive was issued to enable investors to buy or sell raw materials or inputs in foreign currency when they are manufactured by companies that operate in any of the industrial parks. The purchaser will settle the payments from its foreign currency retention account. READ HERE >>


SOUTH AFRICA – CHINA BANS SOUTH AFRICAN WOOL, 25 February 2018
Chinese authorities have suspended South Africa's wool imports because of a foot-and-mouth disease outbreak, leaving the agricultural sector reeling. Wool is ranked the sixth largest exportable commodity in the agricultural sector in 2018 after oranges, grapes, wine and apples. In the same year, wool accounted for 4% of SA's agricultural exports of US$10.6bn, the Agricultural Business Chamber (Agbiz) said. Apparently, over the past five years, China accounted for an average of 71% of SA's wool exports in value terms. China is the world's leading wool importer, taking in more than two-thirds of the world's wool imports in 2017. According to Agbiiz: "… if the current trade friction is not soon resolved, the South African wool industry could be negatively affected as over 90% of production is exported either as greasy wool or in semi-processed form as scoured and wool top." READ HERE >>


SOUTH AFRICA - WORKWEAR MANUFACTURER WOES, March 2019
Diligent readers will recall that in a previous edition of the "African, Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" (see edition No.26 of 2018 - 11 September 2018) I commented that a rumour doing the rounds in South Africa that MB Workwear (SEE >>) – a workwear company located on the KwaZulu-Natal province south coast - was in financial difficulty. MB Workwear is connected to Gelvenor Textiles (SEE >>). Both MB Workwear and Gelvenor are owned by the Jacobs Capital (SEE >>). I posed the questions of whether the company would relocate to Lesotho (it had registered a company there); or, whether it would be to trade its way out of its troubles; or whether it would be rescued by a knight in shining armour (perhaps South Africa's Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)).

Seems like none of these happened. An auction notice has now appeared on the web site of a leading auction house under the heading, "End of Lease Auction" - which states that all MB Workwear's assets will be sold by auction on 14 March 2019. READ AND SEE GOODS TO BE SOLD HERE >>

Comment
My guess is that MB Workwear may become like a workwear design house / brnd and may get its garments made on a CMT basis via a range of manufacturers in South Africa – and perhaps beyond (maybe even in eSwatini / Swaziland).


ZIMBABWE – COTTON PROBLEMS, 4 March 2019
Some private cotton companies are under the spotlight amid revelations they inflated figures of hectarage contracted to small scale growers with a view of being allocated huge quotas during the next marketing season. READ HERE >>

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOME QUICK DATA

UGANDA
The Uganda Minister for Trade, Industries & Cooperatives has stated, in preparation for the "Buy Uganda, Build Uganda" Expo, that Uganda produces an average of 130,000 bales of cotton equivalent to 24,050 tonnes per year. That currently the country has 39 ginneries with an installed ginning capacity of about one million bales. The country's total spinning capacity is 12.2 tonnes per day. The yarn produced is mostly consumed locally for the production of fabric. That the country has a total weaving capacity 80,000 meters per day, and knitting capacity of 8.2 tonnes per day.

SOUTH AFRICA's COTTON CROP ESTIMATES & CONSUMPTION
The first estimate for South Africa's 2018/19 production year indicates a cotton crop of 220,221 lint bales - an increase of 17% over the previous season. Dryland and irrigation hectares show increases of 43% and 20% respectively over the previous year mainly due to the more favourable prices of cotton in relation to competitive crops but also due to renewed interest in cotton production. READ HERE >>

As at the end of December 2018 there were 23,000 tons of seed cotton and 5,835 tons of cotton lint in stock at cotton ginners. Local cotton ginners produced 2,478 tons of cotton lint in December and sold 2,861 tons. Local cotton spinners consumed 897 tons of cotton lint in December 2018, down 8% from December 2017, whilst 2,686 tons were in stock on 31 December 2018. READ HERE >>

Source: Cotton SA
SNIPPETS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

"Restricted Substances List" (RSL). American Apparel & Footwear Federation (AAFA) publishes 20th edition. 26 February 2019.
As the "go-to" resource for industry professionals tasked with chemical management, the RSL lists banned and restricted chemicals and substances for finished apparel, footwear, and home textile products, identifying the most restrictive regulations worldwide. The RSL is an open-industry resource available to AAFA members and the broader community. SEE >>


"Cotton Report - Cotton Production & Trade Trends". Kai Hughes, Executive Director of the International Cotton Advisory Committee (ICAC). November 2019.
A powerpoint presentation overview of global cotton production and the trade in cotton. Some useful data. SEE >>
CLICK HERE TO FORWARD THIS NEWSLETTER TO A COLLEAGUE
PREVIOUS EDITIONS OF THE
"AFRICAN COTTON, TEXTILES & APPAREL MONITOR"
ARE ARCHIVED ON THE WEBSITE

WWW.AFRICANTEXTILESANDAPPAREL.COM
PROJECT NEWS

ETHIOPIA – ILO's BETTERWORK ROLL-OUT BEGINS, February 2019
The full rollout of the International Labour Organisation's (ILO) Better Work Programme Ethiopia has commenced. Some details of the programme can be SEEN HERE >>.

Comment
You can be rest assured that this Better Work programme will not be allowed to go anywhere near the issue of minimum wages in Ethiopia, or the wages that workers are actually paid.

In October 2017 the ILO office in Ethiopia commissioned, as part of the “Improving Industrial Relations for Decent Work and Sustainable Development of Textile and Garment Industry in Ethiopia” project. a study on minimum wages. This, as far as I am aware, has not been publicly released.

I wonder if Better Work will ever get to the bottom of the "no-poaching of workers" arrangements that are rumoured to exist in some of Ethiopia's industrial parks. Apparently, in terms of these informal arrangements, some employers (perhaps with the connivance of some apparel brands / retailers that ultimately buy their garments, agree not to recruit workers who already work in the employ of another manufacturer or who have resigned from another manufacturer in the same industrial park. This is apparently being done for two reasons. Firstly, in order to maintain workforce stability - i.e. workers may see better opportunities by opting to work in another plant in the area, and their resignation disrupts operations where they already work. Secondly, in order to keep wages low, manufacturers agree not to poach workers engaged in other factories by offering them higher wages and benefits as this may have the effect of pushing up the average wages paid to all workers. If these rumour are true - well it looks like bonded employment to me. Seems like "markets" can only work for the bourgeoisie!
----------------------------------------
And ... how low are the wages paid to textile and apparel workers in Ethiopia? One hears lots of anecdotal comments - it also depends if you believe employer claims that the wages include all sorts of other "benefits" - food, transport allowances, etc; or if one believes the claims of the investment promotion agencies that want to entice manufacturers to the new frontier.

In 2016 global retailer H&M (recently, for the eight time, recognised by the Ethisphere® Institute as one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies) published - see "H&M Group Sustainability Report" (page 77) - a bar chart of the wages typically paid to those workers that made its garments (see below) from a select number of countries. For Ethiopia the typical wages paid at H&M supplier companies were recorded at US$44 per month (which they say is made up US$26 "minimum wages" [NOTE: this is wrong Ethiopia does not gave a system of minimum wages], and the rest is considered to be the "average wage of supplier factories"). For those with poor eyesight Ethiopia has the shortest bar in the centre of the bar chart.

H&M AVERAGE MONTHLY WAGES PAID TO WORKERS AT SUPPLIER COMPANIES in 2016
Source: The H&M Group Sustainability Report 2016 (page 77)

Its interesting to note that in a 2017 update of the above table - that was not included by H&M in their 2017 "Sustainability Report" - that the above table disappeared. It did, however, pop-up as a stand-alone one page on their web site. READ HERE >> Strangely though - Ethiopia no longer appeared in the table. I wonder why this was the case???????
----------------------------------------------
Anyway more on H&M and PVH and the wages that they pay in Ethiopia - and their commitment to raise wages via the Action Collaboration Transformation (ACT - SEE>>) initiative - in a future edition of this blog. It does look, from a distance, like any efforts to raise wages in Ethiopia's textile and apparel industry have taken a back seat to their efforts in Cambodia, Turkey and Myanmar - with the consent of the textile and apparel element of the IndustriAll trade union federation.
TO SUBSCRIBE TO THIS NEWSLETTER "CLICK" HERE
RESEARCH

"Labour challenges in Ethiopia's Textile and Leather Industries: No Voice, No Loyalty, No Exit?". V Hardy and J Hauge. In "African Affairs". 2019.
Synopsis: A state-led industrialisation push inspired by the East Asian ‘developmental state' model is at the centre of Ethiopia's recent economic success. This model has historically proved potent for achieving rapid industrialisation, but the business-state alliance at the heart of the model generally aimed to curb the power of labour. Focusing on textile and leather manufacturing in Ethiopia, this article addresses two questions: are workers capable of extracting gains from the process of industrialisation, and have the actions of workers affected global value chain integration in the two industries?

Our data shows that opportunities for a collective voice among workers are limited. However, workers have expressed their discontent by leaving employers when working conditions fail to meet their expectations. The resulting turnover has generated significant obstacles for local and foreign firms attempting to participate in global value chains. In response, the Ethiopian state and employers implemented a number of measures, including restrictions on emigration and more generous non-wage benefits. Recent research on global value chains and labour highlights how workers are able to influence work practices through individual action. The present article builds on these ideas but shows that firms and governments have the ability to respond and limit this power. To access the full paper SEE HERE >>.

"Ethiopia: Agricultural Biotechnology Annual". US Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS). Washington (DC), United States. December 2018.
Synopsis: In 2018, the Government of Ethiopia authorised the cultivation of genetically engineered (GE) cotton by granting official approvals for environmental release. The country is now ready to start with two Bt cotton hybrids namely JKCH1050 and JKCH1947 from India. Cotton is strategically very important in Ethiopia's economy because of the high demand by the expanding textile sector, and it can also create jobs along the cotton value chain. Conventional cotton production is facing a major problem due to pest attacks mainly by the African bollworms and low fiber quality. The full report can be accessed HERE >>.
UPCOMING EVENTS
  • African Cotton Association - Annual Conference - 14-16 March 2019. Bamako, Mali. www.africotton.org
  • Morocco Fashion & Textile - Trade Show - 28-31 March 2019. Casablanca, Morocco. For more information: www.moroccostyle.net
  • Intertex Tunisia - Trade Show - 4-6 April 2019. Tunis, Tunisia. For more information: www.intertextunisia.com
  • 8th International Sustainable Industrial Areas - Conference - 8-10 April 2019. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. For more information: www.siaconference.com
  • Source Africa - Trade Show - 12-14 June 2019. Cape Town, South Africa. For more information: www.sourceafrica.co.za
  • Premiertex Africa 2019 - Trade Show - 18-20 June 2019. Nairobi, Kenya. For more information: www.premiertex-africa.com
  • Destination Africa - Trade Show - 9-11 November 2019. Cairo, Egypt. For more information: www.destination-africa.org
  • Africa Sourcing & Fashion Week (ASFW) - Trade Show - 9-12 November 2019. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. For more information: www.asfw-online.com
  • International Textile Machinery Exhibition - Africa - Trade Show - 14-16 February 2020. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. For more information: www.itme-africa.com
EDITOR COMMENT!
OH THIS IS GONNA BE INTERESTING - TWO MAINLINE AFRICAN TEXTILE & APPAREL SOURCING EVENTS HELD AT THE SAME TIME ... THE ASFW AND THE DESTINATION AFRICA TRADE SHOWS ! SOMEONE IS GONNA BLINCK AND CHANGE THE DATES ... WHO
CLASSIFIEDS
JOBS, TENDERS & PROCUREMENT
MANUFACTURING EQUIPMENT WANTED / FOR SALE
Looking for staff? Want to engage a consultant? Have equipment to sell? Do you need 2nd hand machinery? Have a tender? For a limited period the "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" will publish (free of charge) select classified advertisements from firms / development organisations active in the Africa's crop to shop value chain. Adverts limited to 50 words / 300 characters (and may include a mini logo).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

KNOW MORE ABOUT TRADE & INDUSTRY IN AFRICA
Richard Humphries distributes the most informative African focussed daily trade and industry news clipping services around. It is disseminated to enhance trade policy knowledge and debate. He collects the information on behalf of the Trade Law Centre (TRALAC). Subscribe, at no cost, HERE
CLICK TO SHARE YOUR NEWS
about Mark Bennett - Editor

"The African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor"
I have almost 30 years' experience working in Africa's cotton, textiles and apparel value chain. Initially I was, for 15 years, a sector trade unionist in South Africa; then, from 2004 onwards, I worked as a development consultant for various Southern / Eastern African governments, and domestic private sectors. In my development activities I have been engaged by private sector foundations, and by DFID and USAID funded contractors. I find it rewarding creating development interventions that help cotton, textiles and apparel stakeholders to better processes, improve productivity, increase sales and add investment. See my full CV at Devex or LinkedIn.
------------------------------------------------------
Copyright © *|CURRENT_YEAR|* *|LIST:COMPANY|*, All rights reserved.
*|IFNOT:ARCHIVE_PAGE|* *|LIST:DESCRIPTION|*
The views expressed in this newsletter do not necessarily reflect the views of the editor.

My mailing address is:
*|HTML:LIST_ADDRESS_HTML|* *|END:IF|*

Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

If you would like to subscribe to the newsletter you can also do so by visit the website www.africantextilesandapparel.com

*|IF:REWARDS|* *|HTML:REWARDS|* *|END:IF|*
©2017 ACTAM