VALUE CHAIN NEWS FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT - EVERY TUESDAY
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LOGO OF THE
NEWS & RESEARCH FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT
(#26 / 2018 - 11 September 2018)
www.africantextilesandapparel.com
In 2016 Africa exported US$13.54bn worth of textiles & apparel - US$4.79bn of textiles (including cotton lint) and US$8.75bn of clothing
In 2016 Africa imported US$21.56bn worth of textiles & apparel - US$6.93bn of textiles and Us$14.63bn of clothing
In 2016 the USA imported US$80.7bn worth of garments – of this Africa only contributed 2.4%
SOURCE:
"Textile industry in Africa: A Contemporary Perspective"
Navdeep Sodhi, Gherzi Sub-Saharan African
ITMF Annual Conference 2018; Nairobi, Kenya; 7-9 September 2018
 
NEWS


SOUTH AFRICA – CONTAINER HEIGHT RESTRICTION, 3 September 2018
New regulations regarding the height of these containers when transported on the fleet of trailers currently used by haulers on South African roads, will be enforced from 1 January 2019. "Hi Cube" containers, when transported on a standard 1.6m-deck height trailer, result in an overall height of +/- 4.5m, 20cm over the legislated limit. There is not nearly enough container trailers of the lower height required available in South Africa to legally transport the "Hi Cube" containers on South Africa’s roads. The government move has already resulted in the port company Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) warning that it will not off-load empty "Hi Cube" containers from vessels in South African ports from 1 November 2018 unless shippers and haulers can prove that they are able to forward them on. The implementation of the new legislation following the expiration of a moratorium which has been in effect since September 2011, at the end of December, is putting the government at loggerheads with the entire South Africa export fraternity, as well as road transporters. READ HERE >>


Comment
This may not present many problems for South Africa exporters of textiles and apparel (as their exports are not that great); but it could present significant challenges for South African importers of textiles and apparel. It will certainly create problems for Lesotho's textile importers, and their USA apparel exporters. One can only wonder if South Africa properly consulted (not notified!) Lesotho on this transition - Lesotho is geographically completely surrounded by South Africa! My guess is that South Africa told Lesotho what was going to happen - but hey ... I could be proved wrong ... it won't be the first time!

 

SOUTH AFRICA – CUSTOMS CLAMPDOWN ON SMUGGLING, 10 September 2018
Acting South African Revenue Services' (SARS) Commissioner, Mark Kingon, has encouraged South Africans to join hands in fighting illicit trade and to be cooperative in paying their taxes for the benefit of the economy. During his address, Kingon affirmed SARS’s position in tackling illicit trade in clothing and textiles, tobacco and fuel. “We are going to deal with this one by one, and we are going to get on top of this. “We are not going to stop until we take this scourge out of our economy - that people think they can just avoid paying their rightful dues,” he said. Illicit trade in the clothing and textile industry alone has caused damage to the SA economy, impacting people’s lives, he lamented. “Let’s join hands to stop this nonsense. READ HERE >>


NIGERIA – SCHOOL UNIFORMS CONTAIN AZO DYES, 3 September 2018
Importers who are in the business importing textile materials to Nigeria from China based companies, Sing Shun Fat School Clothier Company and Zenith Uniform Company have been warned by the Standard Organisation of Nigeria (SON) to desist from such act as the materials have been discovered to be carcinogenic. The Director-General of SON has stated that azo dyes found in some school uniforms in Hong Kong contained up to 173mg and 41mg per kilogram of the tested samples respectively. READ HERE >>


UGANDA - NEW TEXTILE INVESTOR, 31 August 2018
Indian investor, Javid Merchant, is set to invest over US$10m in pharmaceutical and textile industries in Uganda. Merchant awaits allocation of land in one of the country’s industrial parks. Apparently, the textile plant will create 1,000 jobs. READ HERE >>


NIGERIA – ADJUSTED EXCHANGE RATE FOR TEXTILE SECTOR, 7 September 2018
The Textile, Garments & Tailoring Senior Staff Association of Nigeria (TGTSSAN) has appealed to the Federal Government to reduce the exchange rate, particularly for the textile sector. Its President said the textile sector has been performing dismally for many years, attributing it to the difficulty in sourcing foreign exchange at affordable rate to enable investors import machines and other equipment for operation. He said: “More than 200 textile firms have been shut as a result of systemic challenges, while some have reduced their production, staff strength and remuneration of workers. READ HERE >>


ZIMBABWE – COTTON, 5 September 2018
Zimbabwe has saved US$20m this year through the use of locally ginned seed in cooking oil and stock feed manufacturing, said Cottco managing director Pious Manamike. READ HERE >>

The Zimbabwe Association of Cotton Value Adders of Zimbabwe (ACVAZ), a grouping of all stakeholders involved in the cotton value chain, is bullish about national seed cotton output this year, which would in turn push cotton lint production upwards. The body expects seed cotton production to more than double to 150,000 tonnes this year from 74,000t produced last year, driven by input support from government, which has seen the cotton hectarage increasing. “We are projecting an increase in lint production. Last year, 74 000t of seed cotton was produced. If converted, it will be 30,000t of cotton lint. We are confident of meeting our lint national demand this year,” ACVAZ director said. READ HERE >>


EGYPT – SHORTER STAPLE COTTON, 4 September 2018
Egypt's Prime Minister said that the percentage of land devoted to growing long-staple cotton will not be reduced. The Prime Minister noted that the government would work to increase the areas planted with high productive medium- and short-staple cotton, with their seeds to be imported from countries that are well-known for planting them. Officials have agreed to cultivate an isolated experimental land plot with short-staple cotton, in an effort to meet the needs of the spinning and weaving factories that are currently importing two million quintal (1 quintal = 100kg) of short-stable cotton. READ HERE >>


AFRICA – CHINESE FIRM MANAGING COTTON PRODUCTION, 5 September 2018
An agribusiness company in eastern China that has made significant inroads in the African market says its growing presence on the continent is boosting economic development and farmers' incomes. Qingdao Ruichang Tech-Industrial Co was one of the first Chinese enterprises to grow cotton in Africa, entering the market in 2003. Back then, the market was dominated by global conglomerates like Cargill, Plexus and Olam, said Liu Yanbo, deputy general manager of the company, based in Qingdao, Shandong province. READ HERE >>


MADAGASCAR – US BUYER VISITS, 5 September 2018
In late August the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID) East African Trade & Investment Hub (EATIH) conducted a buyer mission to Antananarivo (Madagascar) with a large publicly listed United States’ apparel company. The US buyer engaged with apparel companies in Madagascar and identified several sourcing opportunities that could support its production of apparel and related fashion goods across several top brands. READ HERE >>


WEST AFRICA - COTTON PRODUCTION, 31 August 2018
It is forecasted that in 2018/19 (August to July) the growing area for cotton in Burkina Faso, Chad, Mali, and Senegal at 1.71m hectares, a 0.9% increase from the previous year due mainly to reported area increases in Mali. In the period 2018/19 total cotton production for all the aforementioned countries is forecast 11.4% higher than the previous year at 3m 480 lb. bales on expectations of strong prices, good weather, and better pest management. In 2018/19 total exports are expected to increase 10% from the previous year on higher exportable supplies and strong international demand. This update primarily focuses on providing an overview of the cotton sector in Senegal; it includes an abridged analysis for Burkina Faso, Mali, and Chad. READ HERE >>


SOUTH AFRICA – FRAUD AT TEXTILE WORKER HEALTH PROGRAMME, 3 September 2018
Zimbabwe-born US citizen, virologist and South African branch chief at the US Centres for Disease Control (CDC), Dr Alfred Bere, has appeared in the Cape Town Magistrate’s court on a charge of fraud involving R25m (US$1.63m). The charges are related to the mismanagement of donor funding to the South African Clothing & Textile Workers Union’s (SACTWU) Worker Health Programme. The alleged fraud has jeopardised the future of the programme as well as the jobs of several hundred employees of the initiative. The SACTWU programme had, since 2011, been a CDC implementing partner in the US governments Pepfar National Department of Health Programme on voluntary male medical circumcision. In 2016, however, TB and HIV care (THC) became the CDC implementing partner and the SACTWU Worker Health Programme became a sub-recipient of the grant. In 2017 THC, after suspected irregularities had been highlighted by whistleblowers. READ HERE >>


SOUTH AFRICA – FOSCHINI RETAILER RESULTS, 3 September 2018
Notwithstanding challenging trading environments experienced in South Africa and the United Kingdom, the Group produced good results for the 2018 financial year with turnover growth of 21,4% and growth in headline earnings, excluding acquisition costs, of 9,6%. This earnings growth, together with the Group’s ongoing focus on capital optimisation, resulted in a 44,8% growth in free cash flow for the year. TFG Africa’s turnover growth was 6,3%, with cash turnover growth of 7,3% and credit turnover growth of 5,3%. With regards its prospects for the 2019 financial year the company reported Trading conditions remain difficult and constrained in South Africa, the United Kingdom and in Australia however our performance in each of these markets remains very satisfactory relative to our respective peer groups. READ HERE >>


SOUTH AFRICA – REX TRUFORM RETAILER RESULTS, 7 September 2018
The Rex Trueform Group is invested in the property and retail segments. Its interest in retail is through its South African subsidiary, Queenspark which operates fashion retail stores across South Africa and Namibia.

The group’s performance during the 2018 financial year improved significantly compared to the prior financial year notwithstanding the weak economic environment. As a result of the implementation of its strategy, the Retail segment turnover increased by 11.1% to R587.6m [US$38.6m] (2017: R528.8m – [US$34.7m]). Its gross margin decreased marginally to 54.4% (2017: 55.1%) partly due to more aggressive markdowns. Retail operating costs, which included additional store costs, increased by 6.2%. The above resulted in a retail operating profit of R8.2m [US$540k] compared to an operating loss of R1.9m [US$125k] in the prior financial year

The Queenspark strategy includes the introduction of new brands to complement the existing ranges. A number of new brands, together with new product categories, were introduced during the period under review in an endeavour to provide an improved offering to customers. This new strategy, although in its infancy, is progressing well. In line with its longer-term strategy Queenspark opened ten new stores and closed one store during the financial year, bringing its total number of stores to 70, excluding one franchise store in Kenya and two online sales platforms.
READ HERE >>


KENYA – KENYATTA ON THE COUNTRY’S TEXTILE & APPAREL INDUSTRY, 7 September 2018
Kenya’s total apparel exports to the USA stand at US$371.7m, putting her top among countries in the sub Saharan Africa. President Uhuru Kenyatta said this in a speech read on his behalf by Industrialisation, Trade & Cooperatives Cabinet Secretary Peter Munya during the International Textile Manufacturers’ Federation (ITMF) conference in Nairobi. “We need investments if we are to create the jobs which Kenyans need. As you may already know, the textiles and apparels value chain is a key area of priority in manufacturing, which is a central pillar of my ‘Big 4 Agenda’ for the next five years,” he said. READ HERE >>

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AND IN OTHER NEWS ...
 
TAKEOVER OF MAJOR SOUTH AFRICAN SUIT MANUFACTURER IN THE PIPELINE?
A rumour doing the rounds in South Africa's apparel manufacturing circles is that a large South African retail group is considering buying a major South African suit manufacturer. The suit manufacturer is one of the few remaining scale producers of mens' suits in South Africa. A number of suit manufacturers have closed in the past decade - among them Rex Truform's manufacturing division, Pals Clothing, and Trubok. The Trubok closure was particularly sad affair - as in about 2010 it employed about 1,800 workers - many of them in the more job depressed rural areas of the country. The once healthy company closed after a new group of investors, the recipients of significant state funding support (from the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)), bought out the previous management.
 
SOUTH AFRICAN WORKWEAR MANUFACTURER IN TROUBLE
A rumour doing the rounds in South Africa is that MB Workwear (SEE >>) is in financial difficulty. MB Workwear is connected to Gelvenor Textiles (SEE >>) - both are owned by the Jacobs Capital (SEE >>). In 2017 MB Workwear registered a company in Lesotho (SEE >>) - its unclear if this enterprise is also affected. Will the company be able to trade its way out of its troubles? Or will a knight in shining armour (like South Africa's Industrial Development Corporation (IDC)) come to the firm's rescue.
 
KENYA'S MINIMUM WAGES
On 1 May 2018 the President of Kenya announced, at a May Day rally that workers in Kenya would receive a minimum wage increase of 5%. There were howls of protest from the Kenyan business community - including from garment manufacturers. Strange thing is that since then - no wage increase has been gazetted ... and, apparently, no increases have been implemented. The wage increase should have been gazetted with effect from 1 May. Is the Kenyan political leadership retreating from its comitment? Kenyan employers should see what happened in Lesotho - when a delayed increase to the country's minimum wage resulted in many days lost production due to strike action ... and a massive 37.4% increase.
 
ETHIOPIAN WAGE STRIKE
One hears news of a wild-cat strike at the Raymond garment manufacturing facility in Ethiopia. Apparently workers there were, among other issues, wanting a decent annual wage increase - a proposed monthly wage increase of about ETB100 (US$3.62) was rejected. In early July 2018 this newsletter reported on a work-stoppage at the Silver Spark Apparel factory (a suit manufacturer owned by Raymond) in the Hawassa Industrial Park. Unless the issue of minimum wages in Ethiopia is addressed in a holistic way manufacturers there, and their buyers, will continue to face problems. More work-stoppages; and the spotlight of global labour rights NGOs.
 
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FEATURE
SOUTH AFRICA'S
RETAIL CLOTHING, TEXTILE, FOOTWEAR & LEATHER
VALUE CHAIN STRATEGY DEVELOPMENT
THE 'MASTERPLAN'

As was reported in the last edition of the "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" South Africa's Mr Price (MRP) group reported that during the first four months (18 weeks to 4 August 2018) of the financial year ending 30 March 2019, its retail sales growth. Interestingly it reported that its online sales continued to grow strongly by 28.1% to R83.2m. READ HERE >>

As has been reported in previous editions of this newsletter a number of South African cotton-textile-apparel-footwear-retail value chain stakeholders are currently engaged in a process that will lead to the development of “Masterplan” for firms in the industry.

This “Masterplan” – essentially a value chain development strategy for a narrowly defined niche of the broader cotton-textile-apparel pipeline – will run between 2018/19 until the year 2030.
(The comments made hereunder reference a "draft" pdf presentation prepared by the "Masterplan" consultants - circa late August 2018).

A management super structure has been created called the ​"Retail-CTFL Masterplan Project Industry Reference Group​ (IRG)"​. This appears to be composed of: i) Government / parastatals (the SA's DTI and the IDC); ii) Trade Unions (SACTWU, NULAW); iii) 'Fashion' Retailers: NCRFSA; iv) Employers/manufacturers: Cotton SA, TEXFED, SAA-A, ATASA, AMSA, Hometex. Some groups joined relatively late; a huge swath of the value chain is not represented; and the broader public consultation process has been weak. NOTE: have problems with the acronyms? Contact me!)

Its astounding that in this day and age that a value chain plan could be developed till the year 2030! As can be seen from the trading update of the MRP group "online sales" growth has been impressive. In my view it appears that the “Masterplan” strategy has not seriously bothered (or even at all) to take into account the possible entry into the South African apparel retail marketplace of a company like Amazon or Alibaba. When these online behemoths hit South African I predict that there will have to be a fundamental reworking of the apparel and apparel accessories retail model for they will rely on huge amounts of imported garments – and hence the “Masterplan”.

Its highly likely that these online retailers will enter the South African market long before 2030 – they will simply swallow existing online only fashion retailers operating in the region such as Zando (SEE>>) and Spree/Superbalist (SEE >>).

It therefore seems like a folly to plan a strategy to such an end date – no matter how catchy the "end of the third decade" end date appears to be.

I wonder if any of the retail stakeholders engaged in the “Masterplan’s” development have shared the research that they surely must have done on the impact of Amazon and Alibaba. The member of the national Clothing Retail Federation of the SA (NCRFSA) are all large stock exchange listed companies so I guess they must have commissioned some research on this; or at least bought some off-the-shelf reports.

It has been reported that the e-commerce market in South Africa is growing exponentially. According to data from World Wide Worx, e-commerce (all products) has grown by an average of 20% a year since 2000, while new research by Ipsos for PayPal showed that e-commerce in South Africa is likely to reach R45bn (US$2.96bn) in 2018 and R61bn (US$4bn) by the year 2020. READ HERE >>

Any industry plan, especially one that goes to 2030, that does not in detail consider online apparel retail must be considered to be not only "lazy", but also weak!
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And talking about retailers its really strange that the “Masterplan” seems strangely centered around South Africa's largest footwear and apparel retailers that are members of the NCRFSA - shopkeepers like Woolworths, the Foschini Group, Truworths, Edcon, etc. I like to call this grouping of retailers the “Mall Rats”. For sure they sell a huge amount of clothing and footwear - but they are not the only show in town. Those who are glaringly absent from the "Masterplan" deliberations appears to be the myriad of smaller retailers that occupy the South African fashion retail marketplace.

Those left out are not the retailers that one generally sees in the malls of affluent South Africa. Their shops are near bus and taxi ranks, and train stations where working class people commute to and from work; they are in smaller towns, and in the more accessible strip mall type shopping centres. They are not members of the NCRFSA. Here I am talking about fashion retail groups such as: Pepkor (Pep Stores and Ackermans - who may constitute more than 30% of South African textile/apparel retail sales), Retailability (almost 500 stores), Otto Brothers / Power Fashion Factory (about 100 stores), Fashion World (about 200 stores), Decorfurn/CB (about 70 stores), Gemelli's stores, Contempo (61 stores), Traders Warehouse, Goodhope Sales, etc many of whom are virtually of the radars of economic development consultants, and the head offices of many retail executives, and most union officials.

The draft “Masterplan” presentation does doff its hat at these smaller retailers – but it does so under the (draft) “illegal trading” section of the “Masterplan”. As if it is some of these shops that are the only ones engaged in buying i) imported garments whose customs values are not correctly declared; ii) garments made in South African plants where the correct minimum wages have not been paid.

But more on the “Masterplan’s” consultant’s (draft) views on smuggling in a future edition of this newsletter.
 
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Another interesting proposal in the draft “Masterplan” is that any retailer wanting to operate in South Africa should set up a sourcing office in South Africa. This is surely targeting the likes of Zara and H&M and others that may follow them.

The proposal is made – apparently in order to set a “level playing field” - that would compel all South African based retailers to have local sourcing offices. This will be done by introducing a new South African retail (trading) licensing regime. Its most probably the Southern African Clothing & Textile Worker’s Union (SACTWU) who are the prime movers of this provision. Its important to note that SACTWU not only represents workers, but it is also owns a number of high employment textile and garment manufacturing enterprises in South Africa (SEE >>); and also in Mauritius (SEE >>). SACTWU may not only see foreign store owners importing mechandise as local job destroyers, but also competition to its own local and foreign commercial interests!

Its likely that this proposal would have been backed by some of South Africa’s high-end fashion retailers (Woolworths, TFG, Truworths, etc) who have been concerned about the competition from foreign giants. Interestingly the “Masterplan” proposal states that no obligations will be placed upon these retailers with sourcing offices to procure locally made garments.

So its hard to see what this kind of proposal – which in effect has no teeth – can have on any retailers' buying practices.
MASTERPLAN DEVELOPMENT
WHY THE SECRECY?

Not only has the "Masterplan" been developed by a small group of stakeholders - which has left out important sections of the South African value chain - it has often been stitched together in secrecy.

The latest (draft) version of the "Masterplan" presentation - discussed at a meeting of the Industry Reference Group (IRG) in Durban in late August 2018 - was labled "DRAFT - DO NOT QUOTE OR REFERENCE".

Why?

What are the consultants or South Africa's Department of Trade & Industry (ultimately the "Masterplan's" funders) concerned about? I will not, at this stage, raise questions as to why this (mainly) publicly funded consultancy was not tendered!

How can value chain representative stakeholders who participate in the IRG agree to this? How can they liaise with their memberships if they have been told that they should not share details with their general membership? Surely the consultants and the DTI should not be afraid of having to defend the proposals they have developed?

Much of my working life has been undertaken as an official in a trade union - some of this time was in apartheid South Africa. In that period the strength of the union movement was essentially based on the principle that union membership was continually advised of what was going on with regard issues that affected their lives. In this period we lived on the principle of MANDATE, REPORT BACK and ACCOUNTABILITY. This enabled the union movement to succeed in the first part of its quest - to improve the working lives of its members ... and to defeat apartheid.
NEXT WEEK
THE (DRAFT) MASTERPLAN AND ITS PROPOSALS FOR AMENDING THE CUSTOMS TARIFFS ON TEXTILE / APPAREL / HOUSEHOLD TEXTILES / FOOTWEAR / "ACCESSORIES"
OF THE SOUTHERN AFRICAN CUSTOMS UNION (SACU)

AND SOME COMMENTS ON THE VARIOUS TAXPAYER FUNDED CLUSTER PROGRAMMES - MOHAIR / TECHNICAL TEXTILES / COTTON / GEOGRAPHIC
 
 
TABLE OF THE WEEK
TOP 15 AFRICAN STATES EXPORTING APPAREL
TO THE UNITED STATES
USING THE AFRICAN GROWTH & OPPORTUNITY ACT
2017; JAN TO JULY 2017 COMPARED WITH JAN TO JULY 2018
 
RESEARCH

Global Best Practices for Cotton Yield Enhancement in Africa”. 14th Meeting of the Southern & Eastern Africa Cotton Forum (SEACF – for more information on SEACF SEE>>). Harare, Zimbabwe. 4-6 July 2018.

The following presentations are available:

SESSION1: POLICY PERSPECTIVES
Nancy Zitsanza: Cotton Sector Governance in Zimbabwe: Policy, Regulation, & National Strategies
Michael Jenrich: One Variety, One Zone, One Gin Concept
Fungai Simbi: Public & Private Sector Interventions to Improve Cotton Productivity in Southern & Eastern African Region
Jeremiah Tevera: Unpacking the Cotton Grower’s Roles, Challenges and Expectations in the Cotton Production Sub-sector

SESSION 2: TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER
Usha Joshua: FLD in Cotton - Transfer of Technology Practice Advocated for Africa from the Experiences of India
Nkosilathi Nkomo: Development of Value Added Products from Cotton Stalk by product
Richard Musebe: Smallholder Cotton Production: Integrated Crop & Pest Management Technology Transfer & Capacity Building in Kenya

SESSION 3: PLANT BREEDING
Manuel Maleia: Plant Breeding: Stability and Adaptability of Cotton Genotypes Under Multie-nvironmental Conditions in Mozambique
Maco Mare: Determining Adaptability of Medium Staple G. hirsutum Genotypes to the Agro-ecological Conditions of the Lowveld of Zimbabwe.
Kudzai Mandiveyi: New Mahyco cotton hybrids for Zimbabwe and Africa
Ye Wuwei: Cloning and Expression of Drought & Salt-Tolerant Genes in Cotton

SESSION 4: AGRONOMY
Blaise Desouza: Conservation Agriculture the BMP for Sustainable Cotton Production in Africa: Indian Experience
Mathilda Van der Westhuizen: Evaluation of Cotton Cultivars Under Irrigation in Southern Africa
Farid Uddin: Cotton Seedling Transplantation for Adaptation to Climate Change in Bangladesh
Cheidza Gwiranenzara: Impact of Conservation Agriculture on Cotton Productivity

SESSION 5: CROP PROTECTION
Fredy Musiniwa: Measuring Tolerance Levels of Pre-released Gossypium hirsutum L. Genotypes to Verticillium dahlia Kleb.
Yuan Youlu: Genome Wide QTL Mapping for Resistance to Verticillium Wilt, Fiber Quality and Yield Traits in Cotton Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines

SESSION 6: BEST PRACTICES FOR YIELD ENHANCEMENT IN AFRICA
Farid Uddin
Blaise Desouza
Washington Mubvekeri

SESSION 7: GM COTTON PRACTICALS & INTERACTIVE SESSION
Keshav Kranthi: Secrets of High Yields
Keshav Kranthi: Biotech Cotton -Africa

For all presentations see HERE >>.
 
 
UPCOMING EVENTS
  • Origin Africa – Trade Show - 9-11 September 2018. Nairobi, Kenya. For more information: www.originafrica.org
  • Apparel Sourcing Paris - Trade Show - 17-20 September 2018. Paris, France. For more information: www.apparelsourcing.fr.messefrankfurt.com
  • International Cotton & Textile Conference - Conference & Trade Show - 27-29 September 2018. Koudougou, Burkina Faso. For more information: SEE HERE >>; but also SEE HERE >> and SEE HERE >>
  • Africa Sourcing & Fashion Week (ASFW) - Trade Show - 1-4 October 2018. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. For more information: www.asfw-online.com
  • Maroc Sourcing 2018 - Trade Show - 11-12 October 2018. Marrakech, Morocco. For more information: www.marocsourcing.ma
  • Textile Exchange Sustainability Conference - Annual Conference - 22-24 October 2018. Milan, Italy. For more Information: www.textileexchange.org
  • Destination Africa - Trade Show - 17-19 November 2018. Cairo, Egypt. For more information: www.destination-africa.org
  • ATF Expo - Trade Show - 20-23 November 2018. Cape Town, South Africa. For more information: www.atfexpo.co.za
  • 77th Plenary Meeting - International Cotton Advisory Committee (ICAC) - Annual Conference - 2-7 December 2018. Abidjan, Ivory Coast. For more information: www.icac.org and SEE HERE >>
  • Sourcing at Magic - Trade Show - 4-7 February 2019. Las Vegas, United States. For more information: www.ubmfashion.com
  • Morocco Fashion & Textile - Trade Show - 28-31 March 2019. Casablanca, Morocco, For more information: www.moroccostyle.net
  • Source Africa - Trade Show - 12-14 June 2019. Cape Town, South Africa. For more information: www.sourceafrica.co.za
 
CLASSIFIEDS
JOBS
TENDERS & PROCUREMENT
MANUFACTURING EQUIPMENT WANTED / FOR SALE
Looking for staff? Want to engage a consultant? Have equipment to sell? Do you need 2nd hand machinery? Have a tender? For a limited period the "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" will publish (free of charge) select classified advertisements from firms / development organisations active in the Africa's crop to shop value chain. Adverts limited to 50 words / 300 characters (and may include a mini logo).
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TRANSLATORS - SOCIAL & LABOUR COMPLIANCE AUDITING
I get repeated requests from environmental and labour compliance auditing bodies for in-country staff who can assist them with translations when they are undertaking in country audits. If you know of any individuals/organisations who could undertake these kinds of services kindly let me know their details. Country, language competencies, names, contact details please. editor@africantextilesandapparel.com
 
CLICK TO SHARE YOUR NEWS
about Mark Bennett - Editor

"The African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor"
I have almost 30 years' experience working in Africa's cotton, textiles and apparel value chain. Initially I was, for 15 years, a sector trade unionist in South Africa; then, from 2004 onwards, I worked as a development consultant for various Southern / Eastern African governments, and domestic private sectors. In my development activities I have been engaged by private sector foundations, and by DFID and USAID funded contractors. I find it rewarding creating development interventions that help cotton, textiles and apparel stakeholders to better processes, improve productivity, increase sales and add investment. See my full CV at Devex or LinkedIn.
 
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