VALUE CHAIN NEWS FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT
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NEWS & RESEARCH FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT
(#19 / 2018 - 24 July 2018)
www.africantextilesandapparel.com
In 2016 Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mauritius and Ethiopia exported US$23.6m worth of clothes to the seven Arab States of the Persian Gulf
In 2016 the UAE imported US$11m worth of clothes from Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mauritius and Ethiopia
In 2016 Kuwait imported US$5.1m worth of clothes from Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mauritius and Ethiopia
 
NEWS

SUB SAHARAN AFRICA - POST AGOA BENEFICIARIES, 20 July 2018
Kenya is a likely beneficiary of another US export window being considered to replace the African Growth & Opportunity Act (AGOA). AGOA, which grants the country and 40 other African states quota and duty-free access to the US market of more than 6,000 product lines expires in September 2025. “Establishing a more stable, permanent, and mutually-beneficial trade and investment framework with the United States could be transformative for Africa,” said US Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer while hinting at the new trade plan. According to administration sources cited by US think tank Covington’s Global Policy Watch, a branch of a US law firm working on various policy issues, Kenya, Ghana and Côte d’Ivoire could be early contenders for a trade accord with Washington. READ HERE >>


SOUTH AFRICA - NARROW FABRIC WAGE NEGOTIATIONS SETTLED, 23 July 2018
According to the Southern African Clothing & Textile Workers’ Union (SACTWU) it has settled its 2018 wage negotiations for the "Woven and Crochet Textile Narrow Fabrics" sub-sector. Workers in this sub-sector, of the textile industry, will receive an 8% wage increase, plus improvements in family responsibility leave provisions. In addition, the short time notice and consultation period has been extended from 2 hours’ to 48 hours’ notice. This will make it more difficult for employers to place workers on short-time. Approximately 2,000 workers from 35 factories, nationally, will benefit from this increase. Wage negotiations were concluded under the auspices of the National Textile Bargaining Council (SEE >>), with the Narrow Fabric Manufacturers’ Association. Increases will be back dated to 1 July 2018 for all those SACTWU members who have not yet received their increases. READ HERE >>.


SOUTH AFRICA – RETAILER NAME CHANGE, 20 July 2018
Shareholders of Steinhoff Africa Retail (Star) have approved changing the company’s name to Pepkor Holdings in a move to further distance the company from its crisis-hit parent, Steinhoff International. Parts of Star’s business were formally called Pepkor. The resolution to change the company’s name received 99.9% of votes from the shareholders present, Star said. Steinhoff International has been fighting for survival after revealing accounting irregularities which sent its shares tumbling and sparked panic about the credibility of Star’s own accounts. READ HERE >>


SOUTH AFRICA – RETAILER WOOLWORTHS' DISMAL PERFORMANCE, 19 July 2018
Woolworths Holdings Ltd., one of South Africa’s largest clothing and food retailers, said charges related to its struggling Australian business will result in a full-year loss, its first in at least 16 years. Headline earnings per share, which exclude one-time items, fell as much as 20%. The shares declined 1.2% in early trade in Johannesburg, extending declines for the year to 20%. Woolworths is struggling to contend with difficult trading conditions in its main South African and Australian markets, with overall sales increasing 1.6% in the year. Poor product choice in some areas of women’s wear resulted in a drop in South African fashion, beauty and home sales. READ HERE >>


ZIMBABWE – COTTON INPUT DISTRIBUTION, 15 July 2018
About 400,000 households are set to benefit from the Presidential Cotton Input Scheme this year as the Government continues supporting the recovery of the lucrative cotton industry. This was said by Lands, Agriculture and Rural Resettlement Minister at the launch of this year’s scheme in Dande, Mashonaland Central Province last week Wednesday. In the last cotton growing season about 380,000 farmers received support, up from 155,000 growers a year earlier. The cotton input subsidy scheme is running for the fourth consecutive year — having been launched in 2015 when production declined to 28,000 tonnes, the lowest in nearly two decades. READ HERE >>


ZIMBABWE – DEFUNCT TOWELING MILL TO RAISE CAPITAL, 17 July 2018
Merlin Textiles expects to finalise arrangements on a US$5m funding facility from government in the next “few” weeks, an official has said. In a progress update report presented at the creditors’ meeting held in Bulawayo, Merlin’s judicial manager disclosed that he had submitted an application for funding assistance to the government through the Industry, Commerce & Enterprise Development ministry. The fund would cover the company’s medium to short-term needs while it waited for an investor to pour in US$30m. “There is also progress in repair work in the other departments namely, weaving, dyeing and making departments that will enable us to start producing the main product lines which include bath towels, face cloths, kitchen towels, bed sheets and morning gowns.” he said. READ HERE >>

Comment
Now where have I heard the story of a Zimbabwean company raising finance before?


EGYPT – TEXTILE CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT TRAINING, 17 July 2018
In the framework of its “From Cotton Seeds to Clothing” project, funded by the Italian Agency for Development Cooperation, the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) in Egypt will implement, in coordination with the Egyptian Ministry of Trade & Industry, a two-day training workshop on Zero Discharge of Hazardous Chemicals (ZDHC), in collaboration with the relevant Export Councils, and Underwriters’ Laboratories (UL). READ HERE >> More on the UNIDO project can be found here: HERE >>


MOROCCO – ZERO PERCENT TAX INCENTIVE, 15 July 2018
Morocco will exempt new industrial companies from corporate tax for five years to stimulate investment, the finance and economy ministry said. The corporate tax holiday will benefit industrial firms that were created since the publication of the 2017 budget, the ministry said in a statement. The measure aims to encourage investment in 24 sectors including in the textile sector. READ HERE >>


NIGERIA – VLISCO TO INVEST IN 400HA TEXTILE PARK, 17 July 2018
A Dutch firm, Vlisco has expressed readiness to invest on 400 hectares of land for the establishment of a textile park in Nigeria. A representative of Vlisco, David Suddens, stated this on the sidelines of President Muhammadu Buhari’s official visit to The Hague, Netherlands where he met with Chief Executive Officers of Dutch companies. READ HERE >>


NIGERIA – BT COTTON DEVELOPMENT, 17 July 2018
In a bid to revive and reposition ailing textile mills across the country, the Federal Government, through the National Biotechnology Development Agency (NABDA), has announced that it would soon commercialise Bt cotton to ensure an adequate supply of cotton to textile mills. READ HERE >>



KENYA – COMMENTARY ON ITS TEXTILE & APPAREL INDUSTRY, 16 July 2018
The most labour-intensive value chain is the cotton-textiles-apparels value chain;
with massive employment being created in apparel/garment manufacturing and cotton farming. This is the main reason for the government’s decision to deliberately employ measures to grow the cotton-textiles-apparels value chain. Currently, the textiles and apparels sector employs 52,000 people in the Export Processing Zones (EPZ), 21,000 outside EPZs and over 30,000 people in the informal sector. Additionally, the sector provides a steady market to approximately 30,000 small-scale cotton farmers and to over 100,000 people indirectly. In 2017, Kenya exported textiles and apparels products worth over KES40bn (US$397m) to various markets around the world, with the US market taking 85% of the exports. READ HERE >>


AFRICA - COTTON STAKEHOLDERS PREPARE FOR WTO AGRICULTURE NEGOTIATIONS, 16 July 2018
With a view to preparing a roadmap for future negotiations, the World Trade Organisation's (WTI) Agriculture Committee met on 16 July 2018 to discuss issues of “substance”, including domestic subsidies, cotton, market access, export competition and export restrictions. WTO members reviewed new submissions and held dedicated sessions on public stockholding for food security purposes and the Special Safeguard Mechanism to identify the way forward for these issues.

Speaking on behalf of the "Cotton 4" (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali), Benin reminded members of the mandate to address trade distortions (i.e. government subsidies) in the sector “ambitiously, expeditiously and specifically”. Benin thanked members who had recently submitted papers on domestic support and called again for updated data on all trade-distorting support measures. The Chair acknowledged that cotton is an area of prime interest for many WTO members. He reported that some members had suggested that an incremental output could be feasible in this area. The Chair urged all members to submit timely notifications and to reply to the WTO Secretariat's biannual questionnaires on cotton so as to ensure up-to-date information is available on members' cotton policies, values of production and domestic support levels. READ HERE >>


AFRICA – KNITTING MACHINERY MANUFACTURER CELEBRATES 35 YEARS IN AFRICA, 19 July 2018
Africa has always played a significant role for Stoll, a leading manufacturer of flat knitting machines based in Reutlingen, with the oldest agency contract, in South Africa, dating back to more than 35 years. Especially in South Africa and Kenya, Stoll machines, built in the 1950s and 60s, are still running. The company is now sharing its success story and the future outlook on the growth opportunities in the region. For many years, Stoll has successfully served markets such as South Africa, Mauritius, Madagascar and the North African states, including Libya. “In particular, the market around Madagascar is expected continue to develop,” the company says. “As one of the sub-Saharan countries, Madagascar enjoys advantages in terms of exports to Europe and the US. Where products are currently knitted to a large extent on hand machines, before long these will be replaced by electronic flat knitting machinery.” READ HERE >>
 
 
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FEATURE
 
KENYA
ASPECTS OF DEVELOPING A DOMESTICALLY FOCUSED GARMENT MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

Over two decades ago, before market liberalisation policies opened up local economies to mitumba (Kenyan word for "worn clothing"), the clothes were only popular with a handful of Kenyans. The local textile industry was so vibrant back then it employed thousands of Kenyans, and clothed them too. The industry was, in fact, the second largest employer after the public service. Notably, during the boom, the government supported the industry through the Cotton Board of Kenya (CBK), which had an organised marketing system that saw farmers get paid promptly. The CBK also invested heavily in textile factories such as Raymonds and Rift Valley Textiles (Rivatex) in Eldoret, and Kisumu Cotton Mills (Kicomi), which provided ready markets for lint. READ HERE >>
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While Kenya Government wants to give the impression that it wishes to support the development of a domestically focused Kenyan textile and apparel (and footwear) manufacturing industry recent developments in the country have perhaps shown that it has not settled on a mix of policy instruments in order for it to be able to do this. It needs to, with the involvement of its fellow East African Community (EAC) Member States, urgently develop a clear roadmap that would enable it to do so.

Indeed the EAC was recently mandated to do so. A joint communiqué of the 19th Ordinary Summit of Heads of State of the EAC (23 February 2018) stated:

“The Summit, with regard to promoting the cotton, textile, apparel and leather industries in the region, to make the region more competitive and create jobs, decided to prioritize the development of a competitive domestic textile and leather sector to provide affordable, new and quality options of clothing and leather products to EAC citizens. The summit directed the Council to implement this decision and put in place a mechanism that supports textile and leather manufacturing in EAC and report the 20th Summit.”
 
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Some years back Kenya, together with the other EAC Member States, agreed to significantly increase the customs duties on worn clothing imports. The idea was that if worn clothing imports were effectively prohibited that this would partly provide support for a domestically focused garment manufacturing industry. Little consideration was given to the fact that in order to support the development of a domestically focused clothing manufacturing industry that perhaps it was not worn clothing (and footwear) that was their biggest challenge – but that it was also the imports of new clothing.

In addition neither did the EAC Member States did anticipate the response the US government towards their efforts to restrict worn clothing imports. The US administration made it very clear that any restrictions on US origin worn clothing imports would result in the withdrawal of African Growth & Opportunity Act (AGOA) duty free market access privileges. Kenya was the first EAC Member State to buckle in the face of the US’ sanctions. But what is surprising is that not only did it back down … but it did so giving US importers an even better deal than did its fellow EAC Member States of Uganda and Tanzania. Rwanda refused to back down at all and subsequently it was US bound apparel exports were denied duty free status.

A recently published "EAC Gazette" (30 June 2018) now reveals what customs tariff each EAC Member State will impose on worn clothing imports that originate from anywhere in the world. These tariffs are the ones finally agreed upon after the US growled The "Gazette" provides:
  • Kenya to stay application of the EAC Common External Tariff (CET) rate and apply a duty rate of 35% or US$0.20/kg whichever is higher, instead of 35% or US$0.40/kg whichever is higher for one year
  • Burundi, Tanzania and Uganda to stay application of the EAC CET rate and apply a duty rate of 35% instead of 35% or US$0.40/kg whichever is higher for one year
  • Rwanda to stay application of EAC CET rate on HS6309.00.10 and 6309.00.90 and apply a duty rate of US$2.5/kg instead of 35% or US$0.40/kg whichever is higher for one year; and, to stay application of EAC CET rate on HS6309.00.20 and apply a duty rate of US$5/kg instead of 35% or US$0.40/kg whichever is higher for one year.
READ HERE >> (page 6, item 36)

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Interestingly in the 2018/19 Kenyan annual budget the Kenyan Minister of Finance announced:
“… we agreed on Customs duties aimed at promoting industrialization, encouraging local investments, and creating incentives in the agricultural and manufacturing sectors. The measures are also intended to make our products more competitive while at the same time protecting local industries from unfair competition. … our textile and footwear sector are closing down due to increased unfair competition from cheap imported textiles and footwear as well as second hand clothing and footwear. In order to encourage local production and create jobs for our youth in the sector, I have introduced a specific rate of import duty of US$5 per unit or 35% whichever is higher.

But when the "EAC Gazette" was published the customs tariffs were not as the Kenyan Minister stated in Parliament what they would be. The "Gazette" provided for the following customs tariffs:

“Kenya to stay application of the EAC CET rate of 25% and apply a rate of 35% or US$5 per ton whichever is higher for one year with the exception of HS6211.42.10, 6211.43.10 and 6211.49.10. The US$5 per ton shall only apply to items which are in kilograms in the EAC CET."
READ HERE >> (page 13, item 112)

In one effort to try and stimulate a domestic clothing market the Kenya government has allowed firms located in its export processing zones to sell the garments they make in the local market place without the payment of customs duties. It is assumed that many of the garments sold in this way were garments that had been assembled in Kenyan factories using imported duty-free fabrics and garment trims; it is also assumed that many of these garments had not been exported by the Kenyan factories as they were not wanted by their US buyers (for a variety of issues: poor quality, late delivery, etc). The domestic sales of these Kenyan made garments partly contributed towards a mini trade war between Kenya and some of the other EAC Member States who stated that duties should have been paid on the garments sold domestically.

Readers will recall that earlier this year there were howls from Kenyan textile and apparel manufacturers when the government announced an increase in the minimum wages by 5% with effect from 1 May 2018 - they said it would make their businesses uncompetitive. The Gazette containing the wage increases still have to be seen.

Kenya - and other EAC Member States - must realise that knee-jerk interventions to achieve their industry development objectives are perhaps not the best approach to developing a domestically focused regional fibre-texile-apparel value chain. The EAC should proactively support the development of a comprehensive industrial and trade strategy for the regional industry - with national derogation's to cater for minor EAC Member States differences.



TEXTILE & APPAREL RETAIL IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA
CHALLENGES IN EXPANDING MARKETS

Luckily for South Africa’s Mr Price Group (it focuses on supplying customers in the 6 to 10 LSM range ("living standards measure" READ HERE >>) the customs tariffs announced in the 2018/19 Kenyan budget speech (see above) were not implemented. For if they were - especially the US$5.00 per piece specific duty - it may have made their stores not viable. What would have made the situation only worse for the South African headquartered retailer was that in May 2018 the company had bought, for R16m (US$1.2m), back 12 operations from a Kenyan company (Deacons) that had been running Mr Price stores in Kenya on a franchise basis. Nonetheless Kenya's decision to adjust the customs tariff upwards, for 25% ad valorem to 35%, will provide the Mr Price Group with significant trading challenges - as the goods it sells are generally not in the high value categories.

For South African apparel retailers Namibia, which is part of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU), is a very important retail market. Most South African chain apparel retailers have multiple stores in country; and, it is an important profit centre. In 2016, soon after the opening of a major South African style shopping mall in Windhoek (whose grocery and apparel/hometextile retail tenants are mostly subsidiaries of South African chains), the Namibia government wrote to many larger South African retailers demanding that they source more Namibian made goods. There was an implied threat to their trading licenses.

Of course, the problem with the Namibian demand is that they do not have a garment (nor textile) manufacturing industry. Its not that they cannot have a garment manufacturing industry. Previously Malaysia’s Ramatex group operated a very large, US orientated, fabric knitting and knit garment factory in Windhoek; while Jacques Hau, a South African design house, used to be the main supplier of work to Dantago Clothing (the latter’s garments were mainly sold in South African Woolworths’ stores). Both operations have, for different reasons, now closed.

In South Africa pressures have been placed on international apparel retailers to source more locally made products. Sweden’s H&M group and the Spanish headquartered Inditex (Zara), who both operate a limited number of stores in South Africa, have been influenced to find local suppliers. Recently an H&M Africa representative flew from Ethiopia to South Africa to scout for possible clothing suppliers.

One of the conditions related to the Walmart buy out of South Africa’s Massmart group (in 2012) was that it was required (as a directive of the Competition Appeal Court) to pump in R240m (US$17.9m) into a South African "supplier development fund" (SDF).
READ HERE >> Five years later in October 2017 the South African Minister for Economic Development challenged Massmart to extend the term of the programme after its close out date of 31 March 2018. On 20 March 2018 the Massmart Group’s Corporate Affairs Executive confirmed that the company will extend the Fund with an estimated budget of R30m (US$2.2m) per annum in order to further support small suppliers to Massmart.

By the end of the 2018/19 Massmart financial year it is estimated that the group will have procured more than R800m (US$59.6m) worth of goods and services from small and medium sized South African businesses; there are currently 31 businesses participating in their supplier development programme.
Note: Left axis figures are in South African Rands

Source: Presentation to the South African Parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Economic Development by the Economic Development Department (12 June 2018)

Of course its entirely possible that governments in other African countries where Massmart operates will request similar supplier development interventions (of course this is what Namibia has effectively requested). Massmart operates 42 stores outside of South Africa – in Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, Swaziland, Ghana, Nigeria, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya.
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Its highly possible that more and more sub-Saharan African countries are going to start using customs tariffs, and other non-tariff measures, in order to see if they can develop their domestic textile, apparel and footwear manufacturing industries. This may even happen in countries where there are virtually no value chain manufacturers. South African headquartered retailers, many of whom see that they have huge African growth opportunities – will start to see that its not as easy as they thought it would be.
 
FACT OF THE WEEK
IMPORTS OF WOVEN / KNIT / WORN CLOTHING
BY SELECT SUB-SAHARAN PRODUCERS
IN 2016
Source: Comtrade

Trade data is never 100% accurate - it often has major flaws ... however as with many things in life "its perhaps better to approximately right rather than being precisely wrong".

With the above data its possible that some of the garments imported into one country are almost immediately re-exported to another neighbouring country. This often has the effect of over inflating the production of some countries. For example, its likely that some of the new garments imported into South Africa are almost immediately then re-exported by the apparel retailers that imported them to their stores in Botswana, Namibia, Swaziland, Lesotho and even Zambia.

The data reflecting imports of worn clothing into South Africa is not what appears to be either. South Africa has effectively banned the import of worn clothes - something the United States does not appear to be concerned with. Only a limited amount of worn overcoats are legitimately imported each year. However the worn clothing that is imported is not imported for wearing purposes - often South African enterprises import of worn clothing to make cleaning cloths/rags; and in some instances the worn clothing is shredded in order to regenerate the fibers for other uses.
 
 
RESEARCH
2018 - Fashion Industry Benchmarking Study”. Sheng Lu (Ass. Prof. Dept. of Fashion & Apparel Studies University of Delaware for the United States Fashion Industry Association (USFIA)). July 2018.
 
THIS RESEARCH IS NOT ABOUT FASHION!
ITS ABOUT SOURCING TRENDS AND THUS HIGHLY RELEVANT FOR AGOA EXPORTERS
This annual survey (its the 5th Survey) of executives from leading brands/retailers/importers/wholesalers covers the business outlook, sourcing practices, utilisation of free trade agreements and trade preference programs, and views on trade policy. The survey was conducted between April-May 2018; 76% of respondents have >1,000 employees; of whom 64% employ >3,000 workers.


Synopsis: For the second year in a row, “protectionist trade policy agenda in the United States” is ranked the top challenge for the US fashion industry. More than 60% of respondents rank this issue among their top five business challenges, with more than one-third ranking it either #1 or #2, far exceeding concerns about other issues on the list. From 2014 and 2016, respondents consistently ranked trade protectionism between #8 and #11.

The pressure of “increasing production or sourcing cost” is returning this year; 54% of executives rank cost among their top five business challenges in 2018, a notable increase from 34% in 2017. There are two possible explanations: cost could be rising in absolute terms, and the intensified trade tensions caused by the protectionist trade policy agenda may force companies to switch to more expensive sourcing destinations.

Despite concerns about trade policy and cost, executives are more confident about the five-year outlook for the US fashion industry in 2018 than they were a year ago, although confidence has not fully recovered to the level seen in 2015 and 2016. In addition, 100% of respondents say they plan to hire more employees in the next five years, compared with 80-85% in previous studies; market analysts, data scientists, sustainability/ compliance related specialists or managers, and supply chain specialists are expected to be the most in-demand.
RATING SOURCING DESTINATIONS
STRENGTH & WEAKNESSES AS A SOURCING BASE
(page 12)
 
ON AFRICA
"Speed to Market: The US, Mexico, and CAFTA-DR members, unsurprisingly, outperform all other suppliers due to geographic location. For suppliers outside the Western Hemisphere, generally, China and Vietnam offer shorter lead time than other countries in Asia as well as Egypt and members of the African Growth & Opportunity Act (AGOA). This evaluation makes sense given China’s and Vietnam’s overall higher efficiency in supply chain management based on their more advanced local textile and apparel industries.” (page 12)

Risk of Compliance (i.e: factory/social/environmental): Consistent with last year’s finding, the US demonstrates a competitive edge against other sourcing destinations. However, respondents say sourcing from Bangladesh, Cambodia and India involves higher compliance risks in general. Additionally, respondents express more concerns about the risk of compliance from AGOA members this year and the reasons remain unclear.”
(page 13)

“… Labour Cost remains the top factor driving up sourcing cost this year, with 93% of respondents expecting an increase, compared with 73% in 2017. According to industry sources, since late 2017, wage levels started to climb quickly in almost all major sourcing destinations for US fashion companies, including Asia, Central America, and Africa.”
(page 13)

“... other than Vietnam and Bangladesh, to a lesser extent, respondents also plan to somewhat increase sourcing from India, members of CAFTA-DR, Indonesia, Cambodia, and members of the AGOA (Figure 18a). Meanwhile, around 15% of respondents say they will somewhat decrease sourcing from Mexico, Sri Lanka, and Egypt over the next two years (Figure 18b).”
(page 24)

The full report can be
READ HERE >>.
About the United States Fashion Industry Association (USFIA)
"The USFIA is dedicated to fashion made possible by global trade. USFIA represents brands, retailers, importers, and wholesalers based in the US and doing business globally. Founded in 1989, USFIA works to eliminate tariff and non-tariff barriers that impede the fashion industry’s ability to trade freely and create jobs in the US. Headquartered in Washington DC, USFIA is the voice of the fashion industry in front of the US government as well as international governments and stakeholders. With constant, two-way communication, USFIA staff and counsel serve as the eyes and ears of our members in Washington and around the world, enabling them to stay ahead of the regulatory challenges of today and tomorrow. Through our publications, educational events, and networking opportunities, USFIA also connects with key stakeholders across the value chain including US and international service providers, suppliers, and industry groups."

USFIA WEBSITE
 
UPCOMING EVENTS
  • Apparel Sourcing New York - Trade Show - 23-25 July 2018. New York, United States. For more information: www.apparel-sourcing-usa.us
  • Sourcing at Magic - Trade Show - 12-15 August 2018. Las Vegas, United States. For more information: www.ubmfashion.com
  • International Textile Manufacturers' Federation (ITMF) - Annual Conference - 7-9 September 2018. Nairobi, Kenya. For more information: www.itmf.org
  • Origin Africa – Trade Show - 9-11 September 2018. Nairobi, Kenya. For more information: www.originafrica.org
  • Apparel Sourcing Paris - Trade Show - 17-20 September 2018. Paris, France. For more information: www.apparelsourcing.fr.messefrankfurt.com
  • Organic Round Table - workshop organised by the Textile Exchange and Catholic Relief Services - 28 September 2018. Koudougou, Burkina Faso. For more information: SEE HERE >>
  • Africa Sourcing & Fashion Week (ASFW) - Trade Show - 1-4 October 2018. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. For more information: www.asfw-online.com
  • Textile Exchange Sustainability Conference - Annual Conference - 22-24 October 2018. Milan, Italy. For more Information: www.textileexchange.org
  • Destination Africa - Trade Show - 17-19 November 2018. Cairo, Egypt. For more information: www.destination-africa.org
  • ATF Expo - Trade Show - 20-23 November 2018. Cape Town, South Africa. For more information: www.atfexpo.co.za
  • 77th Plenary Meeting - International Cotton Advisory Committee (ICAC) - Annual Conference - 2-7 December 2018. Abidjan, Ivory Coast. For more information: www.icac.org and SEE HERE >>
  • Source Africa - Trade Show - 19-21 June 2019. Cape Town, South Africa. For more information: www.sourceafrica.co.za
 
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TRANSLATORS - SOCIAL & LABOUR COMPLIANCE AUDITING
I get repeated requests from environmental and labour compliance auditing bodies for in-country staff who can assist them with translations when they are undertaking in country audits. If you know of any individuals/organisations who could undertake these kinds of services kindly let me know their details. Country, language competencies, names, contact details please. editor@africantextilesandapparel.com
 
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about Mark Bennett - Editor

"The African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor"
I have almost 30 years' experience working in Africa's cotton, textiles and apparel value chain. Initially I was, for 15 years, a sector trade unionist in South Africa; then, from 2004 onwards, I worked as a development consultant for various Southern / Eastern African governments, and domestic private sectors. In my development activities I have been engaged by private sector foundations, and by DFID and USAID funded contractors. I find it rewarding creating development interventions that help cotton, textiles and apparel stakeholders to better processes, improve productivity, increase sales and add investment. See my full CV at Devex or LinkedIn.
 
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