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NEWS & RESEARCH FROM THE AFRICAN CONTINENT
(#10 / 2018 - 22 May 2018)
www.africantextilesandapparel.com
South Africa’s exports of textiles (HS50-60) to the Mozambique in 2016 was worth US$13,351,747
South Africa’s exports of apparel (HS61-62) to the Mozambique in 2016 was worth US$11,837,847
South Africa’s exports of made up textiles (HS63) to the Mozambique in 2016 was worth
US$6,868,069
 
NEWS
SOUTH AFRICA – H&M TO CONSIDER SOURCING SOUTH AFRICAN MADE APPAREL, 10 May 2018
South African Economic Development Minister has advised that Swedish clothing retailer H&M are set to send a team to South Africa to tour potential South African suppliers as part of a demand for the company to "atone" for racially offensive language printed on one of its sweaters. A furore erupted in South Africa when H&M marketed its "coolest monkey in the jungle” sweater. The advert was judged to be racial insensitivity – and resulted in public demonstrations in some of H&M’s South African stores. READ HERE >>


ETHIOPIA - DEVELOPMENT BANK PRESIDENT TENDER'S RESIGNATION AS TEXTILE FIRM FAILS, 19 May 2018
Almost two years after joining the Development Bank of Ethiopia (DBE), Getahun Nana, former vice-governor of the National Bank of Ethiopia (NBE), has tendered his resignation to the Office of the Prime Minister. The resignation of Getahun came as a surprise and is said to have followed an intense meeting with the DBE Board. Apparently there were frustrations over the levels of the Bank's Non-Performing Loans - which is still above the 15% maximum cap set by the NBE. Sources from within the DBE said that the resignation may have had something to do with the fact one indebted textile factory owed billions of unpaid loans. The Bank, instead of foreclosing the factory (which employs thousands of people) or taking measures, has decided to tolerate its indebtedness given that taking steps against this factory might send a bad message to foreign investors in the country and in particularly to textiles investments. READ HERE >>
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Comment
In issue #8 of the "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" (8 May 2018 - READ HERE >>) it was reported that the Ayka Addis Textile & Investment factory in Ethiopia (which employs around 7,000 workers) was in severe financial difficulty. Is this the plant that may have prompted the DBE President to tender his resignation?

This is not Ethiopia's first textile and apparel manufacturing plant failure; nor will it be its last. In 2016 the Else Addis Industrial textile manufacturer (of Turkish origin - as is the Ayka Addis plant) terminated its operations laying off over 1,000 employees. It was reported that it owed the DBE a couple of hundred million ETBrr, and it also owed many millions more for its land lease. In 2011 the company announced investing US$140m - 63% of which was a loan from the DBE.
READ HERE >>

Textile and apparel investment failures are certainly not unique to Ethiopia. The African continent is littered with them. Almost every country that has made a real push for an integrated textile and apparel industry has had them. They can be divided into two broad categories - failures of state owned enterprises; and, failures by foreign investors. The firm collapses have not only impacted upon the development finance institutions that have contributed loans, but they have also financially knocked water/power/telecommunication companies, landlords, and many thousands of workers who did not get paid nor receive any terminal benefits.

South Africa's development finance institution - the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) - has had many textile and apparel investment failures. It has often faced the dilemmas with respect to whether it should continue to use public funds to bail out failing enterprises that it has already backed, or whether it should it take corrective action which perhaps will result in significant downsizing, or even a facilities' closure. There are many considerations. Sometimes firms are worth saving as they play a crucial role in the value chain; sometimes they employ significant numbers of people in geographically depressed areas ; sometimes a firm can be saved if existing management and the original owners can be removed; etc.

In my view its really worthwhile that governments try to save some of these investments. This does not mean throwing money at the problem; or perhaps giving the enterprise to an existing connected elite.

State development finance institutions (and any associated investment promotion authorities) must develop skilled in-house capacity to oversee their loans and other financial support that they offer textile and apparel investments.
It may be useful if some of the international (e.g. IFC, World Bank) and/or continental (e.g. AFREXIM Bank) development finance institutions created specific textile and apparel capacities that could provide technical support to national development finance institutions involved in the value chain. Specialist knowledge is required - its generally unreasonable to expect that a well qualified officer (a lawyer or an accountant) in a national development finance institution would know about the intricacies of managing a textile or garment plant; about how orders in this global retail driven value chain are given and managed; etc. Specialist support will enable national institutions, and their (often) politically packed appointed boards, to make more informed decisions as to whether to back an investment in the first place; to oversee an investment already in place; to expeditiously intervene when the investment starts to show signs of trouble; and, to advise on how a failed company could be best sold to another investor.


UGANDA – COTTON CROP, 17 May 2018
Uganda, East Africa’s second-biggest cotton grower, has advised that output in the 2017-18 season rose by a third after higher prices in the previous year encouraged farmers to plant more. Output for the harvest that ended in the first quarter of this year climbed to 202,140 lint bales (180kg (397-pound each) from 151,072 bales in the 2016-17 season. READ HERE >>


GHANA – TEXTILE PRODUCERS APPEAL FOR GOVERNMENT SUPPORT, 16 May 2018
Ghanaian textile manufacturing companies are appealing to their government for tax exemptions on their products as an incentive to help revive the industry. According to them this will help them compete with the influx of cheap textile products from China and other parts of the world. READ HERE >>


NIGERIA – COTTON INDUSTRY PROBLEMS, 13 May 2018
The Nigerian Raw Material Research & Development Council (RMRDC) has released over 20tons of certified cotton seeds as well as 1.5tons of foundation seeds to cotton farmers in the country for the 2018 farming season. Concerned by the declining performance of the country’s cotton, textiles and garment sector, the RMRDC advised that it was motivated to continue boosting cotton production so that the idle ginneries starved of seed cotton to gin can come back to operation. The RMRDC stated that out of the 54 ginneries in Nigeria that only 22 were functioning, and at very low capacity. READ HERE >>


ZIMBABWE – EXPORT INCENTIVE FOR COTTON GROWERS, 14 May 2018
In an effort to boost cotton production the Government of Zimbabwe will pay growers an export incentive of 10%. READ HERE >>


MOZAMBIQUE – AGOA STRATEGY ENVISAGES US FOCUSED APPAREL INDUSTRY, 15 May 2018
The Mozambican Ministry of Industry & Commerce has launched the country’s “African Growth & Opportunity Act (AGOA) Utilisation Strategy”. The strategy aims to diversify and increase the country’s exports to the United States. The strategy identifies, among other products, the possibility of the country exporting textiles and apparel to the United States (US). READ HERE >>


(EDITOR: The next edition of the “African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor” will present a mini focus on the textile and apparel aspects of the AGOA Utilisation Strategies that have been developed by AGOA eligible states.)
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Comment
Developing a US focused garment manufacturing industry in Mozambique may be possible – certainly more so than in The Gambia! (The US Ambassador to the The Gambia has recently been reported as saying that the country should export garments to the US!!!) A quick way for Mozambique to do this would be to refocus the order books of Moztex garment manufacturing plant (owned by the Aga Khan Development Network SEE HERE >> - which is located in the former Texlom facility on the outskirts of Maputo), away from servicing South African apparel retailers. But such a move may not necessarily add any employment.

It perhaps would be far better for Mozambique, supported by US development organisations (e.g. the Southern Africa Trade & Investment Hub SEE HERE >>) to consider developing a textile (yarn) and apparel industry that is focused on supplying the regional market place – mainly the Member States of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU); it could also supply textile yarns into places like Mauritius and Madagascar.

Ec=xporting garments to SADC will still provide Mozambique with significant challenges. The Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) protocol on trade has tough trade rules of origin when it comes to apparel. Its also not easy to establish plants in Mozambique - its pool of skilled garment workers is small; there are perhaps not enough suitable (affordable) industrial structures in which to locate significant manufacturing units; and, the country’s (rumored) tight controls when it comes to granting work permits to skilled expatriates may put off many potential garment investors.

The revitalisation of the former Riopele Textiles - now called Mozambique Cotton Manufacturers (MCM) SEE HERE>> – perhaps demonstrates one textile development trajectory that may be possible for Mozambique to pursue. That of beneficiating a portion of its massive cotton crop into cotton yarns. Mozambique made yarns could be used to feed the textile industries that exist in Mauritius and South Africa; and it does have the opportunity of potentially supplying markets in the East, and in Europe. It may be possible for Mozambique to get some of the companies it grants cotton area concessions to to develop spinning mills. (Sometime back it was rumoured that Plexus Cotton SEE HERE >> may have been interested in developing a spinning plant in Mozambique.)


TOGO – TO ESTABLISH INDUSTRIAL PARKS WITH APPAREL FIRMS, 16 May 2018
Under its 2018-2022 national development plan (which is in the process of being finalised) Togo’s government plans to establish a manufacturing hub and two industrial parks. It is planned that each of the parks will have 15 factories producing textile, shoes, among other products, for export. READ HERE >>


LESOTHO – SA WOOL TRADING GROUP REGISTERS IN COUNTRY, 4 May 2018
South African wool mohair auctioneers, BKB SEE HERE >>, have registered a local company in Lesotho in a bid to save its wool and mohair trading business interests that were under threat after the Lesotho government indicated that it would move (via legislation) to block the selling of its wool clip in South Africa. For the past 44 years, BKB has been selling wool and mohair on behalf of 40,000 local farmers through an auction in Eastern Cape. READ HERE >> and READ HERE >>.
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Comment
The relationship between BKB and the Government of Lesotho has not been an easy one. Proposed changes to Lesotho legislation have irked BKB – which would obviously prefer the 'business as usual' model – i.e. all wool produced in Lesotho is sent to its South African operations. The move by Lesotho may result in some of this woll being processed in Lesotho (i.e. some woolwashing/scouring).


TANZANIA - COTTON PRICE PAID TO FARMERS, 16 May 2018
Tanzania's Agriculture minister has stated that the drop of cotton price in the current buying season was caused by deducting 100 TSh (US$0.044) per kg to pay for pesticides used by farmers. The cotton buying season was launched in early May with the cotton price dropping from 1,200 TSh per kg (US$0.53) in the previous season to 1,100 TSh (US$0.48) in the current season. READ HERE >> It had been previously reported in Tanzania media that the reduction in the amounts paid to farmers could be due to depressed world prices; and, the fact that Tanzania was not beneficiating the cotton locally!
 
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NEWS STORY FOLLOW-UP

MOHAIR GOAT ABUSE III - THE SOUTH AFRICAN STORY CONTINUES

In two editions of the "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" (#8 of 8 May 2018; and #9 of 15 May 2018) I have covered news related to an exposé by the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) organisation relating to animal cruelty on some South African mohair goat farms.


SOUTH AFRICAN INDUSTRY MINISTRY TARGETS MOHAIR SECTOR

It has now been established that the mohair sector has been identified by the South African government as one that should be supported. The most recent iteration of the South African Department of Trade & Industries' (DTI) Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP) 2018/19 to 2020/21, that was released in early May 2018 READ HERE >>, specifies that the sector will get targetted government support going forward - ironically much of the support hinges on "sustainable practices".

IPAP states the following:
 
Mohair value-addition to transform locally manufactured quality tops, yarn and finished products for both local and export markets
 
Nature and purpose of the intervention: Ongoing technological innovation and development in raw mohair fibre yield, fibre quality and fibre availability, based on sustainable practices and procedures, to establish South Africa as a significant contributor and preferred supplier to the global mohair value chain.

Targeted Outcomes: A strong mohair sector strategy through engagement with the broader mohair industry to develop sustainable practices to improve fibre quality and value-addition.

Key Milestones: 2018/19 Q2: Completion of phases 1 and 2 of a sustainability system dynamic modelling project for the entire value chain, to increase commitment to farming Angora goats and manufacturing value-added products. 2018/19 Q4: New markets developed for value-added products with special focus on exports.

Lead departments/agencies: the DTI supported by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and the South African Economic Development Department
.



WHAT THE IDC IS DOING ABOUT THE ANIMAL CRUELTY ISSUES
The "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" asked South Africa's Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) whether it would be proceeding with the IPAP intervention or would it wait for the broader South African mohair sector to get its house in order first before any further work was undertaken? The IDC tersely responded:
 
"Yes, IDC is and will be playing its mandated role in developing the SA mohair industry in the years to come. In fact, this has already started last year with the establishment of the Mohair Cluster, a joint initiative between the DTI, IDC and major industry role players."

Clearly the issues raised by PETA and the fact that many global textile and apparel brands and retailers have indicated that they would dump mohair products has not raised any public red flags for the IDC.

In response to a question about the precise nature of the interventions in the mohair sector, and the total amount of funds budgeted for the intervention, the IDC advised that a Mohair Cluster is addressing all aspects of the mohair value chain holistically and that all queries should be directed to Mr. Martin Viljoen at +27 82 455 3263, or satiec.grow@mweb.co.za.
 


LESOTHO ORIGIN MOHAIR AFFECTED (18 May 2018)
As was predicted the problems on South African mohair goad farms are now impacting on Lesotho - much of whose mohair clip is sold via South African marketing channels. READ HERE>>


GLOBAL BRANDS AND RETAILERS DITCH MOHAIR PRODUCTS
 
A news report (21 May 2018) by "Bloomberg" news has stated that over 70 clothing companies have indicated that they would stop selling mohair products Source.
 
According to PETA the following brands / retailers have “banned” the sale of mohair products: Ann Inc. (including brands: Ann Taylor, Loft, and, Lou & Grey), Accessorize, Anthropologie, the Arcadia Group (including brands: Burton, Dorothy Perkins, Evans, Miss Selfridge, Outfit, Topman, Topshop, and, Wallis), Athleta, Barbara’s Cinnamon Puffins, Colovos, Daniel Cremieux, Destination Maternity, Express Inc., the Gap Inc. (including brands: Athleta, Banana Republic, and, Gap), H&M Group (including brands: Arket, Cheap Monday, COS, H&M, H&M Home, Monki, and, Weekday), Inditex (including brands: Bershka, Massimo Dutti, Oysho, Pull & Bear, Stradivarius, Uterqüe, and, Zara), Lazy Oaf, Monsoon, Overstock.com, Reformation, and, The White Company Source. It has also been reported that M&S, Next, Mango, Primark and Esprit are also banning the sale of mohair products Source and Source. Some of the bans appear to be immediate; while some of the bans will take effect from a defined period of time in the future.
 


Comment
It certainly looks like this issue is something that the South African mohair industry has been unable to get on top of. A response strategy which says that PETA exposé is "factually incorrect and a gross misrepresentation" does not seem to be getting South Africa's mohair industry anywhere as more and more brands and retailers ditch mohair products. This is not the time for, what appears to be, 'public relations 101'. Mohair South Africa, together with other stakeholders such as the South African and Lesotho government, relevant parastatals (including the IDC), trade unions, need to urgently meet to develop a credible strategy and roll that strategy out fast otherwise the value of a mohair goat will not be its fibers ... but its meat!
 
FEATURE

FIVE FACTS ABOUT THE SOUTH AFRICAN RETAIL TRADE SECTOR

The South African retail trade sector is made up of five divisions: wholesale, motor, accommodation, food and beverages (i.e. restaurants and catering), and retail. Statistics South Africa SEE HERE >> takes a look at five facts concerning South Africa's retail trade industry.


Fact 1: South Africans spent R31,900 (US$2,538) per second in retail stores in 2017

South African consumers spent R1trillion (US$79.6bn), at current prices, in the retail trade industry in 2017. This translates to about R31,900 (US$2,538) spent per second across the industry during the course of that year.

And consumers weren’t shy to spend a little more in 2017 than they did in 2016. Spending on retail was up by 2,9% in 2017 compared with 2016 in volume terms (constant prices), higher than the 1,7% annual growth recorded in 2016, but lower than the 3,3% in 2015.

Stores specialising in food and beverages had particular reason to smile. They saw their sales rise by 5,0% in 2017, the second largest annual growth rate recorded across various store types, after the miscellaneous ‘all other retailers’ category. Hardware stores, however, saw a decline in sales.
 
Fact 2: General dealers are responsible for 44% of sales

Despite general dealers experiencing lacklustre growth of only 1,1% in 2017, they dominated the industry in terms of sales value. For every R100 (US$7.96) that consumers spent at retail stores in 2017, R44 (US$3.5)was spent at general dealers, which includes supermarkets.

The second largest contributor was stores specialising in clothing and textiles, contributing R18 (US$1.43) for every R100 (US$7.96) of total sales
.
Fact 3: Meat accounts for 8,1% of total sales income

South Africans love their meat. A detailed list of products shows meat as the most popular commodity in the retail trade industry, contributing 8,1% to total sales income in 2014/15. Pharmaceutical goods and female clothing were the second and third most popular products, according to Stats SA’s Retail trade industry, 2015 report. The top eleven products that contributed half of total sales income are shown below.
Fact 4: Non-specialised stores are the largest employer

In 2014/15, over one-third of the 812,104 individuals working in retail were employed in non-specialised stores. Clothing stores were second, employing 23% of the retail workforce.
Fact 5: Non-specialised stores pay the lowest salaries

Non-specialised stores have the highest number of employees but the lowest salaries. The average annual salary for a person working in a non-specialised store was R66,044 (US$5,255) in 2014/15, lower than the average of R93,632 (US$7,403) for the entire retail trade industry. Compare this with the average salary for employers in retail outlets specialising in pharmaceutical goods.
  1. The most recent monthly "Retail Trade Sales" by Statistics South Africa (StatsSA) publication can be accessed HERE >>.
  2. Download the StatsSA "Retail Trade Industry - 2015" report HERE >>. The media presentation for the report – containing employment, financial and salary information – is available HERE >>. The reporting period was the financial year ended on any date between 1 July 2014 and 30 June 2015. Similar articles are available on the StatsSA website and can be accessed HERE >>.
 
FACT OF THE WEEK
Mozambique's largest (2016) textile and apparel export item is classified under HS52:
  • HS5201 (cotton lint) out of US$22,521,908 in total sales, the largest purchasers were: Mauritius (US$10,147,353); followed by Indonesia (US$4,120,128); then India (US$4,065,357).
  • HS5205 (cotton yarns) out of US$4,301,207 in total sales, the largest purchasers were: South Africa (US$2,316,605); followed by Portugal (US$1,757,801); then China (US$226,800).
Mozambique's largest apparel export item falls under the HS62 customs tariff classification - woven garments. It would be interesting to know:
  • precisely what kinds of garment these are?
  • whether they are being cleared into South Africa, at zero duties, in terms of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) protocol on trade?
  • and, if they are being exported into South Africa in terms of the SADC preferential trade agreement, where the fabrics used to make these garments originate from? The SADC preferential trade deal specifies that in order for the goods to qualify for duty free adminssion into South Africa that they must be made with fabrics that are made in any SADC member state.
Depending on the type of garment the per unit values of item HS6206 seem to be very low - on average US$1.22 per unit; for HS6203 on average US$2.04 per item; and, for item HS6205 on average US$2.20 per unit.
 
RESEARCH & REPORTS

Bt COTTON IN SUB SAHARAN AFRICA

The following mini-research reports, which all touch on the issue of Bt cotton in select African states / regions, have been prepared by the United States' Department of Agricultures’ Foreign Agricultural Services (USDA FAS). SEE HERE >> The progress that some countries are making with regards Bt cotton roll-out is closely related to their ambitions to develop their own textile manufacturing industries.

ETHIOPIA: “Biotechnology (Bt) and Other New Production Technologies” (29 December 2017)
Ethiopia completed its 2nd round of Bt cotton confined field trials in 2017 and commercialisation is expected within the next couple of years. The introduction of an enhanced cotton variety is expected to contribute to greater levels of cotton production that are needed to satisfy the demand of Ethiopia’s growing textile and apparel sector. READ HERE >>

NIGERIA: “Biotechnology (Bt) and Other New Production Technologies” (27 December 2017)
Nigeria established the National Biosafety Management Agency in 2015 to regulate the country’s Bt law and provide oversight for utilising and commercialising Bt products. Bt cotton (and other products) are at different stages of field and confined field trials. READ HERE >>

KENYA: “Biotechnology (Bt) and Other New Production Technologies” (14 December 2017)
Genetically engineered (GE) gypsophila will likely reach the market before Bt cotton and Bt corn, as GE Gypsophila is not subject to national performance trials (NPTs) stipulated in the Kenya Seeds & Plant Variety Act. In addition, the non-controversial nature of the GE plant in terms of food and environmental safety, favours its early release into the market. The commercialisation of Bt cotton will follow later in 2018 when the NPTs are completed. In September 2017 the Government approved the environmental release, through open field trials, of Bt cotton in an effort to revive Kenya’s cotton industry. READ HERE >>

SOUTH AFRICA: “Biotechnology (Bt) and Other New Production Technologies” (20 December 2017)
The production area of Genetically Engineered (GE) corn, soybean and cotton in South Africa increased to 2.7m hectares in 2016, a 17% increase from the 2.3m drought-reduced hectares in 2015. As a result, South Africa remained the ninth largest producer of GE crops in the world and by far the largest in Africa. Bt cotton was the first GE crop variety to be grown commercially in sub-Saharan Africa. The cotton area planted soared by 120% to 18,341 hectares in the 2016/17 production season, from 8,353 hectares in the 2015/16 production season. The increase in hectares planted was mainly due to better climatic conditions and positive movement in cotton prices. READ HERE >>

FRANCOPHONE WEST AFRICA: “Biotechnology (Bt) and Other New Production Technologies” (17 December 2016)
On 26 July 2016 the President of Cote d’Ivoire announced the implementation of the national biosafety law after its adoption by the Parliament on 1 July 2016. Senegal is revising its biosafety law and expects to submit the final draft to the parliament for adoption by the end of December 2016. Burkina Faso did not plant Genetically Engineered cotton in the agricultural season 2016/17 due to the unresolved problem related to a short fiber length. READ HERE >>




GLOBAL COTTON TRADE - US AGENCY REPORT (10 May 2018)
The USDA's' FAS produces a monthly publication entitled "Cotton: World Markets & Trade". The May 2018 provides the USDA’s first detailed forecast for the 2018/19 marketing year. It forecasts world cotton stocks ending slightly down. However stocks outside of China will increase for the third year in a row and reach a record at just over 50m bales. Ending stocks are forecast to increase in nearly all major producing and consuming countries as global production remains high relative to consumption. In contrast, China’s ending stocks are forecast to fall for the fourth consecutive year and be less than half the level seen in 2014/15. Continued reserve sales and strong consumption growth in China will combine to work down stocks. READ HERE >>
 
UPCOMING EVENTS
  • Africa Occupational Safety & Health (A-OSH) - Trade Show - 22-24 May 2018. Johannesburg, South Africa. For more information: www.aosh.co.za
  • Source Africa - Trade Show - 20-21 June 2018. Cape Town, South Africa. For more information: www.sourceafrica.co.za
  • 14th Symposium of the Southern & East Africa Cotton Forum - Workshop - 4-6 July 2018. Harare, Zimbabwe. For more information: SEACF
  • Apparel Sourcing New York - Trade Show - 23-25 July 2018. New York, United States. For more information: www.apparel-sourcing-usa.us
  • Sourcing at Magic - Trade Show - 12-15 August 2018. Las Vegas, United States. For more information: www.ubmfashion.com
  • International Textile Manufacturers' Federation (ITMF) - Annual Conference - 7-9 September 2018. Nairobi, Kenya. For more information: www.itmf.org
  • Origin Africa – Trade Show - 9-11 September 2018. Nairobi, Kenya. For more information: www.originafrica.org
  • Apparel Sourcing Paris - Trade Show - 17-20 September 2018. Paris, France. For more information: www.apparelsourcing.fr.messefrankfurt.com
  • Africa Sourcing & Fashion Week (ASFW) - Trade Show - 1-4 October 2018. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. For more information: www.asfw-online.com
  • Textile Exchange Sustainability Conference - Annual Conference - 22-24 October 2018. Milan, Italy. For more Information: www.textileexchange.org
  • Destination Africa - Trade Show - 17-19 November 2018. Cairo, Egypt. For more information: www.destination-africa.org
  • ATF Expo - Trade Show - 20-23 November 2018. Cape Town, South Africa. For more information: www.atfexpo.co.za
  • 77th Plenary Meeting - International Cotton Advisory Committee (ICAC) - Annual Conference - 2-7 December 2018. Abidjan, Ivory Coast. For more information: www.icac.org
 
CLASSIFIEDS
JOBS
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MANUFACTURING EQUIPMENT WANTED / FOR SALE
Looking for staff? Want to engage a consultant? Have equipment to sell? Do you need 2nd hand machinery? Have a tender? For a limited period the "African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor" will publish (free of charge) select classified advertisements from firms / development organisations active in the Africa's crop to shop value chain. Adverts limited to 50 words / 300 characters (and may include a mini logo).
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ETHIOPIA - EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
TURNAROUND MANAGER
ERTICALLY INTEGRATED TEXTILE & APPAREL FACILITY

The appointee will, working with key stakeholders, diagnose the current situation of the factory and then design/execute a turnaround strategy. The work will include a corporate strategy diagnosis to identify where the factory can improve, and the development of subsequent courses of action to make the factory profitable in the long-term. For 3 months the appointee will diagnose problems and develop a strategy; in the following 9 months he/she will roll-out approved actions. The appointee may, with prior approval, hire additional experts. Deadline for applications is 15 June 2018. For full details contact: info@equiception.net
 
CLICK TO SHARE YOUR NEWS & PICTURES WITH US
about Mark Bennett - Editor
"The African Cotton, Textiles & Apparel Monitor"
I have almost 30 years' experience working in Africa's cotton, textiles and apparel value chain. Initially I was, for 15 years, a sector trade unionist in South Africa; then, from 2004 onwards, I worked as a development consultant for various Southern / Eastern African governments, and domestic private sectors. In my development activities I have been engaged by private sector foundations, and by DFID and USAID funded contractors. I find it rewarding creating development interventions that help cotton, textiles and apparel stakeholders to better processes, improve productivity, increase sales and add investment. See my full CV at Devex or LinkedIn.
 
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